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Blueprint to Beating the Big Blue Black and Blue – Part 2

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Back by popular demand (popular demand being defined as, at least, one person asking me to do this), I will now attempt to predict how the Cowboy's can stop the otherwise vaunted run attack of the Giants and their potentially dangerous aerial game.

But the first thing we have to do as a collective fan base, is brain dump everything we thought we learned from this unit against Tampa Bay, for three reasons:  1.  It was the first game.  The players adrenaline is higher than normal, the pressure to prove ones value is higher, it's the first game the starters play a full 4 quarters, and the coaches have very little film to game plan against the opposing team (I'm sure there are the factors, but those are the major ones).  2.  I honestly believe the Bucs are better than what they are getting credit for.  Admittedly, they could use a different QB.  But Antonio Bryant, Michael Clayton, Kellen Winslow, Jerramy Stevens, Cadillac Williams and Derek Ward are not pedestrian weapons; they have all been considered dominant players at their perspective positions at some point in their careers, if not as early as last year (Bryant, Ward, Stevens).   Furthermore, that OL played an outstanding game, in my opinion.  3.  For the first time in a long time, despite the win, the defensive players are not satified with their performance and are committed to correcting what many have agreed are correctable issues.

Feel better?  Okay, let's move on.

First, our starters:

Defensive Line:

Jay Ratliff (6'4" 303):  This analysis is going to be long; we all know who Ratliff is.  Next.

Marcus Spears (6'4" 309):  Like many players returning from last year's squad, he committed to improving his game over the offseason.  Be that due to personal pride or the fact that he is entering a contract year, I think we can expect him to be solid throughout the year; against the Giant's, though, we will need more.

Igor Olshansky (6'6" 315):  For the time being, I have to give Igor an incomplete on his grade.  The trouble is, in the 3-4, defensive lineman effectiveness is very hard to evaluate because their job vastly differ's from a 4-3 lineman.  But, if Demarcus isn't getting his sacks, that's should be a good indication that Igor is not doing his primary job:  keep Ware in one on one blocking situations.

Jason Hatcher (6'6" 305):  Of all the back ups, Jason seem's to have the most potential to eventualyl unseat a current incumbent.  He get's good penetration, and can push the pocket on even starting quality offensive lineman.

Junior Siavii (6'5" 318):  Thus far, he has been invisible.  On the defensive line, that's probably the most significant criticism you can offer.

Stephen Bowen (6'5" 306):  He comes in at a close second, behind Jason Hatcher as a back up.  He has good size and a decent motor.

Linebackers:

Demarcus Ware (6'4" 262):  Listening to an interview following the Bucs game, he admitted he was never quite right after that first hit that sidelined him while they assessed the severity of what was later revealed to be a concussion.  My understanding of league rules is that he should not have played from the point forward, but there is little trainers can do when a player like Ware makes his mind up that he is going to pass every test they throw at him to determine rather or not he is good to go.  Beyond ability, let this serve as a reminder to his committment to this team and his awareness of how important it is he is standing on the field as a factor in the game or not.

Keith Brooking (6'2" 241):  This quote says everything:  "We've got to go in with a mentality that we're not going to allow them to run the ball on us, period.  No matter what happens, no matter what we call, no matter what they run, it's on us to be where we're suppose to be.  And when we get there, get there with bad intentions!"  To that, all I can say in reference to his position is, 'Zach who?'.  For those of you who contend that talk is cheap, he has the career stat sheet to back his talk up!

Bradie James (6'2" 247):  Following the ugly Bengals game last year, players seemed content to squeak out a win against a lesser opponent.  Flash forward to this week and from the vast majority of the defense from the Head Coach down the mantra is the same, "We have to play better," Bradie James admitted.  "We know that."  Nuff said.

Anthony Spencer (6'3" 255):  Throughout his career, thus far, he's been inconsistent.  He has all the physical tools and speed, but he tends to revert to his college day MO of trying to outrun the tackle/TE by going around the block to get to the QB/ball carrier.  In the NFL, in the 3-4, it is imperative, regardless if it involves being taken out of the play by a blocker, that he own his gaps of responsibility.  The 3-4 can be a very effective defense (as the Steelers and Baltimore's chart topping defenses should suggest), but it requires unselfish players at every level, who obey their assignments.  If he doesn't take the blocker in his gap, the blocker will have the opportunity to pick up someone in the secondary and that typically mean's a long run, if not TD, by the ball carrier.  For an example of what to do, take a look at what Demarcus Ware has become excellent at.  He takes on the block and while using one arm to disengage the blocker, he uses his other arm to bring down the carrier or corral him towards other manned gaps.  It requires Demarcus trusting that his teammates will be where they are supposed to be, but again, that is absolutely crucial for the 3-4 to be effective.

Bobbie Carpenter (6'2" 249):  Bust.  We've establish this much.  But I do believe he is, at least, a servicable replacement for Kevin Burnett.  And if you think about it, had we drafted Bobbie in the 3rd round, like Burnett, instead of the 1st, the criticism of Bobbie wouldn't be nearly as bad; and that was Parcells fault.  At any rate, the one thing the Cowboy's are doing with Bobbie that I ardently oppose is him being a member of the goalline defense.  His instincts, size, and frame do not matchup well to most NFL team's goalline offense.  And I really just cannot envision him getting in the air meeting a RB trying to dive over the pile.

Corners:

Terence Newman (5'11" 195):  When healthy, he's clutch.  If health had not been an issue in 2007 and 2008, I might even say he's pretty close to being a shut down corner.

Orlando Scandrick (5'10" 192):  Thus far, I'd say he has proven he should be the 2nd starting corner over Mike Jenkins.  A true student of the game, we can expect him to be well prepared for the Giants.

Mike Jenkins (5'10" 198):  He has the tools and the frame defenses like for their corner.  It's the mental side of his game that typically get's in the way.  Rather it is over-thinking or a lack of thinking, the jury is still out.  But, I will say, I like him starting over Anthony Henry, Pacman Jones, and Alan Ball.  And if I'm not mistaken, the guys at football outsiders actually think pretty highly of him, as well.

Alan Ball (6'1" 188):  He proved beyond a shadow of a doubt that he was the best corner behind the above 3 in training camp and in preseason.  But with his only competition being the likes of Courtney Brown, Mike Mickens, DeAngelo Smith and Julian Hawkins, that really isn't saying much.

Safeties:

Gerald Sensabaugh (6'0" 210):  We've seen good and we've seen bad.  He's certainly a better coverage guy than Roy Williams, Keith Davis and Patrick Watkins, but he has not been as good as advertised against the run.  Thus far, preseason included, team's have not had opportunities deep, but he sure has been called for quite a few penalities; most notably the defensive holding call that nullified a Mike Jenkins interception against the Bucs this past Sunday.  I have a theory:  As much as Wade Phillips gushed about what Sensabaugh, in particular, add's to his defensive scheme's, I can't help but wonder if he is over-thinking and committing these stupid penalties to live up to the hype.   Honestly, I think that little bit of phsychology may have also been an issue for quite a few of the Cowboy's players in 2008.   Regardless of his excuse for mental error's, it's unacceptable and against the Giant's the Cowboys will need every part of his focus.

Ken Hamlin (6'2" 209):  Much has been made about those two infamous missed tackles at the end of the game against Baltimore, closing the door forever on Texas Stadium.  But for the most part, considering the injuries that created a turnstile at various positions in the Secondary, I honestly believe Ken Hamlin did the best he could with what he had.  As the Quarterback of the defense, it is his job to ensure that all of those rookies and bottom of the roster feeders forced to play due to the suspension or injuries, are lined up correctly.  Ultimately, it comes down to his ability to trust the other guys lining up back in the secondary, to do their job.  He could not do that last year.  In his trying to compensate for poor play by those other positions, his position suffered.  But that's just my opinion.  Either way, Hamlin has been known to throw everything he has into hit's and he will be primed to hurt people when the Giants are in town.

Special Teams:

Matt McBriar (6'1" 220):  Prior to his injury early last year, he was on pace to be a Pro Bowl selection.  He has a boot that can put the ball 60 yards from scrimmage, but from what I understand, DeCammalis has wisely requested he adjust his kicks to not out-punt the coverage.  Thus far, this adjustment has paid off.

Nick Folk (6'1" 222):  The dynamic of a defense changes when backed against it's own endzone.  The Cowboy's may rely on Nick quite a bit to ensure we don't leave points on the field.

David Buehler (6'2" 228):  He will likely end the season as the Touchback king of the league, which is huge, but that's not the only place he will contribute.  He also helps on punt coverage and for a guy who beat out all of the highly touted linebackers drafted from USC this year in the combine at the 40 and on the bench, he is not to be taken lightly as an open field tackler.

Of all the defensive player's above, Special Teams will likely be where the Cowboy's win this game.  The Giants, barring turnovers, should have a long field to traverse each time they start a drive.  This will be huge in the wanning moments of the game, particularly considering that of all the attributes their receivers can offer, burning our defense for a quick score likely won't be one of them.

Now here's the motley crew the Giant's will be throwing at the Cowboys:

Offensive Line:

For any NFL team, anything done offensively begins in the trenches.  Partly because I'm lazy, but mostly because it's unnecessary, I'm going to skip the individual breakdown of the Offense Line.  When you think of the Giant's OL, most Cowboy fans can't name one player from the offensive side of the ball with a hand on the ground, anyway.  And for the Giant's, that's a good thing.  Why you ask?  Because that mean's they are a cohesive unit that get's recognized for their cumulative efforts and not just that one dominant presence; example:  Joe Thomas of the Browns.    But, if you consider the 5 sacks the Cowboy's were able to compile the last time these two team's met, you know they are not without their flaws.  Granted, the Giant's didn't have Brandon Jacobs in that game, so that should change Wade's approach a bit.  But keep in mind, despite his TE like frame, Jacobs is actually notoriously horrible at pass blocking, which is why we won't see him catching to many balls Sunday night (unless it's on the chin, figuratively speaking; I'm sorry, I had to).  In for sure passing situations, we will likely see Ahmad Bradshaw manning the RB position.

Running Backs:

Brandon Jacobs (6'4" 264):  To be honest, he doesn't scare me.  Personally, I believe if you took away his stellar offensive line and committee of RB's around him, he would be considered an average RB, at best.  With a full head of steam, he is extremely difficult to bring down.   But if the Cowboys can slow his initial acceleration, by simply hitting him (notice I didn't say they have to tackle him at this point) before or shortly after he crosses the line of scrimmage, his overall production will be marginal.  I will admit, however, if the Giant's are within 3 yard's of the Goalline, because of his presence, and, of course, that offensive line, it's an automatic 6 in my opinion.  By the way, if you didn't quite get the clowning I was delivering at BJ's expense in paranthesis at the end of my assessment of the Offensive Line, in other word's, I'm predicting he's going to suck against the Cowboys.

Ahmad Bradshaw (5'9" 198):  I wouldn't say he scare's me, but he does draw more concern from me than BJ.  First, he is the RB they will rely on the most in pass protecting, now that Derrick Ward is gone, meaning that he is the guy most likely to catch are defense with their pant's down expecting the pass.  Furthermore, he is in the mold of those RB's from last Sunday the Cowboys played against, though I've forgotten their names adhering to my own advise.  Last year, Ahmad only compiled 60 yard's, but with those 12 attempt's, he averaged 5 yards per carry.  In 2008, he had 355 yard's on 67 attempt's for an average of 5.3 yard's.  And in 2007, he averaged 8.3 yards per carry, with 190 yards on 23 attempts.  If anything, you can say he consistently put's the Giants in 3rd and relatively short.

Danny Ware (6'0" 234):  Statistically speaking, we don't know much.  In 2008 he had 2 carries for 15 yard's, averaging 7.5 per carry, but that could hardly be considered a trend.  Judging from what I've read, he likely could be described as a cross between BJ and Bradshaw, not only in size, but in style, as well.  Last year, he was the preseason team MVP amassing 180 yard's on opposing team leftovers and bubble-riders.  What that says about him and how he will fare against the Cowboys, if he even see's the field, is beyond me.

Wide Receivers:

Steve Smith (5'11" 195):  With 6 passes for 80 yards against the Redskins, Smith was Eli's favorite target.  His longest reception of the day was 26 yard's, so if the Giants do try to test our Safeties, it will likely be with him.

Domenik Dixon (6'2" 182):  Last year, he owned the slot, amassing 596 yards on 43 receptions.  He is also dangerous after the catch.  Scandrick will have his hand's full, but with our selection of cover Safeties, Scandrick shouldnt' have to many problems keeping Dixon in check.

Sinorice Moss (5'8" 185):  The younger brother of self-proclaimed Cowboy-killer Santana Moss, he never has lived up to the Giants expectations.  He has shown flashes, but thus far has failed to be consistent, particularly at catching the ball.

Mario Manningham (5'11" 183):  He scored a 6 on the Wunderlich and was considered as too slow to play receiver in the NFL.  Most team's had scratched him off of their draft boards.  But the Giant's saw something in him and if the Washington game is any kind of indication, with one year under his belt, they are beginning to reap the rewards.

Ramses Barden (6'6" 227):  Though he likely will never be Plaxico Burress, his size affords him the ability to be that type of weapon in the readzone.  His performance for a 3rd round pick was impressive in preseason, but he has yet to catch a ball in the regular season.  If the Giants are within 10 yards of scoring, I would not be suprised if the Giant's don't, at least, put him on the field to give the defense something more to think about.

Hakeem Nicks (6'0" 215):  The Giant's 1st round pick was touted as being the most NFL ready receiver available; Jeremy Maclin perhaps being the lone exception.  Early in training camp and preseason, though, Ramses Barden was earning the vast majority of the buzz.  The light's seemed to come on late, but again, it was preseason.  Against the Redskins, he collected two passes for 18 yards, 11 yards being his long.  If anything, you can say he catches what is thrown at him; Darrius Heyward-Bey, the top receiver drafted, unfortunately, cannot make that claim.

Tight Ends:

Kevin Boss (6'6" 253):  Jeremy Shockey was the Giant's T.O..  And Kevin Boss is the Giant's Roy Williams.  Kevin may not have the amount of talent Shockey possesses, but the Giants, with the baggage Shockey added brought to the team, are better off with out him.  Parallel aside, Boss would still be the 3rd TE on the Cowboy's depth chart.

Travis Beckum (6'3" 239):  Drafted in the 3rd round, behind Ramses, Travis topped quite a few list for TE's available this year, making him a steal in the 3rd.  However, he has not been targeted in the regular season, and only caught two passes for 37 yards throughout preseason.  It may take a year or two to see him reach is potential.

Darcy Johnson (6'5" 252):  If he does see time, he is mostly considered a blocking tight end.  In 3 years with the Giant's he has only caught 4 passes for 46 yards.

Analysis:

Like the Cowboys, having jettisoned Plaxico Burress and Amani Toomer in the offseason, the Giants have an offense that flourishes by spreading the ball around and keeping opposing defenses off balance by pounding the run, using a few different types of ball carriers.  The Cowboys defense likely won't dominate the Giants.  That may be asking a little much.  What I am counting on is that the Cowboys will win the field position battle through special Special Teams and the Cowboys offense will ultimately outscore the opposition.   The key for the Cowboy's defense is to keep the pressure on Eli, even if it doesn't result in Sacks, and ensure that their running game cannot be relied on to extend drives and dominate the time of possession ratio throughout the game.

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I am 35, married and a father of 2 boys. I have been a Cowboys fan since Jimmy Johnson took over; not because I had anything against Tom Landry, but because it just so happens I was old enough to start following and understanding football right as that new era began. Since then, I haven't missed games if I could help it.

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9 Comments
  • Joe C

    Canty, Hakeem Nicks, and Aaron Ross are reportedly out for Sunday’s game, if this holds true that’s gotta be a plus for the Cowboys!!!

  • Jonathan

    Like I alway’s say Joe, I’ll take what advantages the opposing team gives me, but as a fan, the victory is not as satisfying when they are not at full strength. The Giants now have a built in excuse for losing, and that, to a certain extent, takes a little of the pressure to win off their shoulders.

    • Mick

      Jonathan,
      – No excuses here!
      – I think your ‘boys would win this game even if my Giants were completely healthy. Combo of best talent in the league (except maybe San Diego), adrenaline of new stadium, relatively healthy roster, and no distractions this early in season makes ‘Boys just about unbeatable . . . for now.
      – Though I would never call a defeat a good defeat, the mental and emotional makeup of the Giants will turn this defeat into a motivational springboard.
      – Obversely, we’ll see your ‘Boys feel the hype and pub from this win (and others), and they will eventually lose their edge.
      – Romo is a borderline great QB, but he doesn’t possess the Force of Personality necessary to fill the leadership void that exists there. That’s what happens when you have fools navigating the voyage.
      – JJ assembled a great team in the 90’s and had a great leader (other JJ) to steer the starship (who eventually ejected from the cockpit). But like Al Davis and George Steinbrenner, he’s lost his way because his ego CAN’T HANDLE having strong leaders around him. This is the ONLY reason why your Cowboys will eventually fail once again, and deep down I’m sure you all know this to be true.
      – BTW, I’m not so unobjective that I’m predicting a Giant Super Bowl, but I believe we have a better shot because we have talent, depth, leadership and a quality organization from the top down. I hope Jerry keeps Wade indefintely – until then I’ll worry more about the Eagles. Unless I get some replies from you guys, I’ll just assume that y’all just agree with me!

    • Arjay

      So then what’s the Cowboy’s excuse for losing to a depleted team? Hell, Flozell even cheap shotted Tuck to add to the Giants injuries and they STILL LOST!

      You can talk about “it was only by 2 points”, “Romo gave them the win” blah, blah, blah. Bottom line is the Giants won, in Jerry’s new palace, his self proclaimed new wonder of the world. When it counted most Romo choked and Eli came up clutch again. The Giants capitalized on the Cowboys mistakes and limited theirs. And if you want to cry that Romo gave the ball away then the Giants spotted Dallas points by only scoring FGs in the red zone. If they scored TDs it would’ve been a blowout. Woulda, coulda , shoulda.

      Good teams win the close ones. Bad teams lose them.

  • Joe C

    To me a win is a win, regardless who they have out there playing. I don’t think it will be even less incentive to win for the Boys, it’s their home-opener in a brand new bad*** stadium. They will def. be hyped and still ready to take whatever the Giants throw/run at em. I can’t wait.

  • Mike D

    Yeah, so how’d that “Blueprint” work out for ya?
    oh Jonathen…Once again Super Bowl MVP Eli comes up Big and Chokmo poops himself in a big game..3 years now I have been telling you that Romo is garbvage. When are you going to figure it out?

  • Jonathan

    Mike D. Weak. That’s all can I say is weak. You keep your trap shut all week and then, once your team has already won, then you want to talk trash. Mirror time in the morning must be miserable for you.

    Admittedly, Romo had a bad day. Eli’s career accuracy as compared to Romo, even after Sunday, tell’s me that he has had his fair share of issue’s throughout his career. Regardless of what we saw Sunday, I still say Romo is the better QB. So to answer your question, I’ll never “figure it out!”

    • Arjay

      While I admire your loyalty to your QB I have to think it’s because Dallas has no choice than to stick with Romo. While his overall passer rating, accuracy, yards, TDs etc. may be better than Eli’s he doesn’t have what Eli possesses. Guts. While it would be great to see Eli put up “fantasy” numbers I will take 250+ yards and more TDs than int’s every game that leads to a win anytime. Especially when wins come in big moments like the Super Bowl and the opening of Cowboys Stadium.

      And this is with no name receivers. Dallas has a supposed #1 in Williams, Witten, Bennett. And they were home in their brand new stadium, all those fans, dancing girls, celebrities…big moments just ain’t Romo’s thing huh?

      • bags030404

        You are completely correct with your depiction of Tony Romo and the woulda, coulda, shoulda of sunday nights game. Point taken I get it! However your depiction of Eli Manning is not very good! He is an average QB, that is all he has been and all he will be. Is that good enough to win a Super Bowl in New York? Yes! but must I remind you that Brad Johnson also has a Super Bowl victory to his credit? What I am saying is that Super Bowls, Big games, close games are won by TEAMS not by QB’s! and for right now New York has the better team. However even you must admit New York has a loooooooong way to go if the Super Bowl is on your mind.

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Watch: Cowboys LB Jaylon Smith Goes Bowling for First Time Since College Injury

Sean Martin

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Should Cowboys Start Negotiating a Contract Extension With Rod Smith?

Dallas Cowboys Linebacker Jaylon Smith did not just defy all odds and return to normalcy in 2017, starting as the Cowboys' middle linebacker for a full 16 games. He became one of the team's and NFL's brightest success stories, earning the right to celebrate everyday activities returning to his life - as football did this season.

Jaylon Smith on Twitter

It's been two years since I've been able to bowl! Man it feels good to have my hobby back. #ClearEyeView #Swipe #StillGotIt! 210 average🤷🏾‍♂️🙏🏾 https://t.co/euVsXDKS2a

This is exactly what Jaylon Smith did on Twitter Friday afternoon, posting a Snapchat video of himself bowling. The caption on Twitter adds that Smith was enjoying his time at the lanes for the first time in two years.

It was January 1st, 2016 when Jaylon Smith's injury in the Fiesta Bowl against Notre Dame changed his outlook forever. In that moment, Smith went from a projected top ten pick in the 2016 NFL Draft to a LB that would need a team to take a chance on him - and be patient.

The Dallas Cowboys proved to be that team, using the 34th overall pick on the Notre Dame star and supporting his efforts to return to the field from day one. The entire Cowboys' organization was rewarded by Smith remarkably playing every game this season, inspired by his constant determination to do just that.

Are Dallas Cowboys Building A Championship Defense? 3

Dallas Cowboys LB Jaylon Smith

So, a normal offseason for Jaylon Smith is anything but right now. Still battling the drop foot condition (one that is reportedly healing well and "fading") which limits his movement ability in the lower body, Smith is a normal Dallas Cowboys football player from this point forward.

He can say he's already defined all odds, can expect to take an even bigger stride forward in 2018, and Jaylon Smith can go bowling again. You can't help but be happy for #54.

Tell us what you think about "Watch: Cowboys LB Jaylon Smith Goes Bowling for First Time Since College Injury" in the comments below. You can also email me at Sean.Martin@InsideTheStar.com, or Tweet to me at @SeanMartinNFL!

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Dallas Cowboys

Will Cowboys WR Noah Brown Get Bigger Role in 2018?

Jess Haynie

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Noah Brown

While only a seventh-round pick in the 2017 NFL Draft, receiver Noah Brown was on the Cowboys' roster for all of his rookie season. He returns in 2018 hoping for a bigger role in Dallas' offense, and with some good possibility to get one.

Brown was not a big part of the 2017 offense. He was at the bottom of the WR depth chart, inactive for three games and not seen much even when in uniform.

Noah was only targeted nine times last year. He caught four passes for 33 yards.

Assumably, this had less to do with Brown and more with the other mouths to feed in the Cowboys passing game. Dez Bryant, Jason Witten, Terrance Williams, Cole Beasley, Brice Butler, even fellow rookie Ryan Switzer; you get the idea.

Noah Brown

Dallas Cowboys WR Noah Brown

2018 should remove at least one of those obstacles to Noah Brown's opportunities. Brice Butler is a free agent and there is no indication he is coming back.

Everyone else is still under contract, but that could change if the Cowboys start making any cuts to improve the salary cap. Bryant, Beasley, and even Witten, with varying degrees of probability, are all considerations as cap casualties in the next few months.

In the 2017 preseason, the 6'2", 220-pound Noah Brown reminded us of a young Dez Bryant. He has the same thick body and even showed some of the same punishing running style after the catch.

Of course, Noah hasn't shown nearly enough in college or as a rookie to say he could replace Dez. Nobody's suggesting that. But he has flashed the potential to be given more looks in the passing game.

Another way Brown could get on the field more next year is for run blocking. He has the size and power, and the Cowboys will certainly be leaning on the run with Ezekiel Elliott back and Dak Prescott needing to find his groove again.

Even if he moves up a notch from Brice Butler's exit, Noah Brown's primary way of staying active in 2018 will be through special teams. That was the key for him last year; Brown was active for 13 games because of his special teams work.

Hopefully, Noah can work his way into more targets next season. The Cowboys' receivers need to get younger and a seventh-round pick emerging would be tremendous value.

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Dallas Cowboys Continue Search for Coaching on Defense

Sean Martin

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Dallas Cowboys Search for Defensive Coaches Continues

With the hiring of Doug Nussmeier as their tight ends coach, the Dallas Cowboys' new look coaching staff is technically filled out for the 2018 season. Head Coach Jason Garrett, with coordinators Scott Linehan and Rod Marinelli underneath him once again, will lead this team into battle with new coaches at LB, OL, QB, WR, TE, ST, and in the secondary.

Despite most of their changes coming on the offensive side of the ball - where the Cowboys certainly under performed in 2017 - the Cowboys did lose one of their most highest regarded defensive coaches in Matt Eberflus this offseason.

Given their personnel on Rod Marinelli's side of the ball, the Cowboys may have actually upgraded in replacing Eberflus with Kris Richard. The Cowboys' young secondary is sure to remain a hot topic all the way until training camp, now being led by the architect of the Seahawks' vaunted "Legion of Boom".

Clarence Hill Jr on Twitter

Cowboys are not done with coaching hires. Still trying to add defensive quality coach, per source

With Defensive Coordinator Rod Marinelli potentially entering his final season in the NFL though, the Cowboys' search for talented coaches on the defensive side of the ball is reportedly not yet over.

Already promoting a former quality control coach in Ben Bloom to fill Eberflus' role as linebackers coach, the Cowboys' commitment to finally building a top defense is exciting for Cowboys Nation. Another solid draft haul on this side of the ball could turn any spot on the defensive coaching staff here into a highly coveted one.

Not only having the talent in place to return to the playoffs in 2018, the Cowboys are looking to take full advantage of their current staff to secure a bright future for this young team in years to come.

Exactly who the Cowboys are targeting to hire remains unknown, but they did interview former DB Ray Horton prior to hiring Kris Richard. Horton carries six years of experience as a defensive coordinator, most recently holding the position in 2016 with the Cleveland Browns.

Jon Machota on Twitter

Cowboys coaching staff changes:

It is also important to note that Marinelli, known as a defensive line specialist, still holds this positional coaching job - a unit the Cowboys should also look to add an experienced coach to. The next Cowboys DC may still be added to the staff this offseason, if not done so already with Richard the heir apparent at the moment for Marinelli.

Tell us what you think about "Dallas Cowboys Continue Search for Coaching on Defense" in the comments below. You can also email me at Sean.Martin@InsideTheStar.com, or Tweet to me at @SeanMartinNFL!

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