Connect with us

Dallas Cowboys

Did Kyle Orton Take Advantage of the Cowboys?

Published

on


Kyle Orton’s contract was originally a 3-year-contract at $3.5 million per season. The Cowboys played with the money, agreeing to give him about $5.9 million the first year - $5 million of which was a signing bonus. They paid him only $1.35 million last year. And then he was going to get the other $3.25 million this year.

Essentially, it was a 3 year deal with 2/3rds of the money paid in the first 2 years and the remaining 3rd paid in the last year.

In addition to the Original Structure, which pushed some of the Salary of the first two years into the Salary CAP of this coming season, the Cowboys restructured Orton’s deal twice to get more room under the Salary CAP.

In November 2012 the Cowboys asked Orton to restructure his deal because they were out of Salary CAP space, and they needed to sign some new defensive players due to injury. In what was a pure paperwork accounting ploy, they extended his contract to 5 years, but the last two years were automatically voided after this coming season.

Technically, the Cowboys added two more years of salary at $3.5 million per year - for a total 5 year deal at $17.5 million. But since the last two years automatically voided after the coming season, it was really still a 3 year deal at $10.5 million.

So, Orton was still on a 3 year deal, but for Salary CAP purposes, his bonus, which had been charged to the Salary CAP at $1.667 million per year, was now spread over 5 years at $1 million per year. The Cowboys used the extra $667K to sign some defensive players for Rob Ryan's defense. (They did the same deal with Doug Free in order to spread his bonuses over 5 years instead of the 3 years remaining on his 2011 contract - with two voidable years after next season at $8 million per season.)

In the original deal, Orton agreed to be paid $3.5 million per year. He collected $7.25 million over two years, which is in line with his original deal. The purpose of how the Cowboys structured his contract was to help them on the Salary CAP because, as we all know, they were really having Salary CAP issues the last two seasons.

Last season, the Cowboys once again asked Orton to take "Bonus" money up front in lieu of salary, and spread the savings over 4 years remaining on his bogus five-year-deal.

The supposed $3.4 million Orton might have had to pay back was ALL money he allowed the Cowboys to push into later years for Salary CAP reasons. But from an original agreement perspective, Orton got paid 2/3rds of the money for 2/3rds of his original 3 year deal.

It would have been unjust for the Cowboys to attempt to collect that Bonus money back, since the only reason it has not already been charged to the CAP was to allow the Cowboys to overspend the last two years. The Cowboys did the right thing by dropping what was essentially a bogus claim to getting money paid back to them. Technically, they had a legal right to it, but morally, it wasn't right.

THIS IS REALLY IMPORTANT:

hr02

If the Cowboys had pursued getting paid back the money, when the only reason they had a legal right to it was because the player agreed to help them out on the salary CAP by the structure of the contract, it would have crippled them in all their future negotiations with other players on restructuring contracts to get Salary CAP relief.

Based on the Orton example, other players and their agents would have NO REASON to agree to restructure their salaries into bonuses spread out over several seasons. If players believed the Cowboys would pull a bait and switch by trying to get paid back for money the players already got paid, they would have to protect themselves from the Cowboys by keeping the money as salary to prohibit the Cowboys having a legal right to try to collect the money. Players would refuse to restructure.

That would severely hurt the Cowboys, and cause them not to have the ability to play around with the Salary CAP in the future. While sports reporters are mentally retarded when it comes to understanding math and accounting, you can be very sure that agents and players would notice that the Cowboys didn't treat Orton fairly.

Free Agents would refuse to sign with the Cowboys. Rookies would insist on higher salaries and lower signing bonuses. Drafted players would refuse to resign with them after their rookie contracts expired. And the Cowboys would become pariahs among NFL player agents. In short, it would have destroyed the Cowboys if they went after Orton's money - money that did not morally belong to them.

Stephen Jones and the Cowboys front office were smart enough not to do that.

The "stand-off" never became adversarial between the Cowboys and Orton. Simply put, the Cowboys never intended to go after that money because it would have hurt them more than Orton. They were just trying to get Orton to play this year because they genuinely believed the team would be better with him backing up Romo. Orton genuinely wanted to retire.

The "stand-off" was a media generated myth. And the supposed leverage the Cowboys had? Also a myth. The only reason it was reported that way is because most sports reporters are idiots when it comes to understanding contracts.

CONCLUSION

hr02

Orton DID NOT screw over the Cowboys. He was paid 2/3rds of his contract value for 2/3rds of the work. Players get cut every year prior to the end of their contracts. And players retire every year prior to the end of their contracts.

Orton did nothing wrong by retiring a year early. And the Cowboys did nothing wrong by giving him time to change his mind. This was an amicable parting of the ways, and you shouldn't believe that either the Cowboys or Orton did anything wrong. Both parties handled themselves properly.

When Orton informed the Cowboys of his intentions to retire back in March, it allowed them to go out and sign two backup quarterbacks with NFL starting experience – Brandon Weeden and Caleb Hanie. The Cowboys will actually save money on the salary CAP by Orton’s retirement, since the price of Weeden and Hanie combined is less than the cost of Orton. Orton treated the Cowboys respectfully. He forfeits his claim on the final 1/3 of the money and the Cowboys don’t owe him anything more. He owes them nothing either.

Good Luck to Orton in his post-NFL life, and Go Cowboys.


Engineer, writer and private NFL analyst, he began developing his own statistical analysis program in 1998 to measure and predict the performance of NFL teams. Scott is also a self-taught expert on the NFL salary CAP, analyzing how Cowboys contracts affect the team this year and in future seasons. Mr. Harris' skill lies in digging inside the numbers to explain which statistical measurements matter, and which do not. Mr. Harris developed his skill at writing for his college newspaper, and had his own politically oriented blog for several years. A passionate fan of the Cowboys, Scott uses his skill with numbers and writing to provide a unique viewpoint of the Cowboys and the NFL as a whole. He is a native of the DFW metroplex and currently resides in Golden, Colorado designing environmental controls systems for data centers, high rise buildings, college campuses, and government bases.

Advertisement
2 Comments
  • guest

    Nicely laid out from a cap analysis POV, which is more helpful than most other pieces being written which could explain WHY Orton would want to force this issue. If it’s a not a retirement and he still wants to play, it begs the question of why he wanted out of the final year, e.g. chance to sign as a starter elsewhere? Back to Chicago to back up Cutler until he inevitably gets hurt? Or, maybe he saw the addition of Linehan as the offensive play caller as the final cook that broke the kitchen? i.e. Orton no longer had a voice even in the QB team, since now completely downed out with the voices of Jason Garrett, Scott Linehan, Bill Callahan, Wade Wilson, and Tony Romo in the mix.  I don’t think Orton had a problem holding the clipboard for a final year at $3.5m, but he seemed to be effective in almost a QB coaching role as the backup. Now there’s no room for him to contribute in this mix and the team actually IS better off with low-cost rookie who can just watch and learn instead.

  • Dan Davis

    Cowboy fan here.

    This is a great article which the rest of the sports writing media entirely missed.

    Bravo.

Dallas Cowboys

4 Depth Players to Keep in Mind on Dallas Cowboys Roster

Sean Martin

Published

on

4 Depth Players to Keep in Mind on Dallas Cowboys Roster 2

Maneuvering through the NFL offseason is a funny task for committed football fans, especially those of Cowboys Nation. Prior to the start of each new season bringing hope for all 32 clubs to reach the Super Bowl, every NFL roster enters a tumultuous state. Talent will be added through free agency and the Draft, while promising players will also be shuffled around through practice squads and training camp releases.

All of that to say, despite criticism for appearing stagnant so far this offseason on the heels of a 9-7 campaign, nobody knows what the Dallas Cowboys will actually look like in 2018. This is why I've decided to feature four under the radar players on the current Cowboys' roster below, all of which provide depth at positions of need.

4 Depth Players to Keep in Mind on Dallas Cowboys Roster

Dallas Cowboys TE Blake Jarwin

TE Blake Jarwin

An undrafted free agent out of Oklahoma State, Blake Jarwin found his way onto the Cowboys' practice squad for 2017.

Jarwin showed enough promise early in his Cowboys career to earn fans on the coaching staff and throughout the organization, as he was promoted to the active roster in week eight. The Philadelphia Eagles were reportedly in position to snatch Jarwin from the Cowboys - who protected their versatile tight end.

The TE position remains unsettled for the Cowboys in 2018 and beyond, with Jason Witten's production clearly declining. The Cowboys will also be on their third TE coach in three seasons this year, transitioning to Doug Nussmeier.

Nussmeier brings no previous experience as a TE coach specifically, meaning the team's overall philosophy on the position will still be determined heavily by Offensive Coordinator Scott Linehan. Favoring tight ends that can block in the running game over those with higher upside as receiving threats, Jarwin is a name to keep in mind as a tenacious blocker that plays with sound technique.

4 Depth Players to Keep in Mind on Dallas Cowboys Roster 1

Dallas Cowboys WR Lance Lenoir, QB Cooper Rush

WR Lance Lenoir

This past summer, I had the chance to interview Dallas Cowboys WR Lance Lenoir following his signing with the team out of Western Illinois. In that interview, Lenoir shows off the confidence he took into training camp as a receiver that would have a hard time making the team.

By the end of this long season, the Cowboys went from being perceived as deep and talented at WR to in need of new play makers on the outside.

Perhaps pressing a bit through the preseason, Lenoir did provide practice depth as a reliable pass catcher and punt returner, struggling on special teams in live action and ultimately spending the season on the practice squad.

The 2018 NFL Draft features a deep class of talented receivers, and the Cowboys would be wise to draft one with real potential that can push up the depth chart in a hurry. As far as current options on the roster to fill this position, WR Lance Lenoir can't be overlooked as an athletic target with NFL size and strength - entering his second season in Dallas.

DT Datone Jones

A mid-season acquisition from the Green Bay Packers, Datone Jones flashed as a defensive tackle in the limited opportunities he received. A five-year league veteran, Jones showed the ability to play with power and leverage at the 1T position - a spot the Cowboys are thin at right now.

Jones' versatility also suited him well, playing with impressive burst and disruptive ability as a pass-rushing 3T.

The addition of one more starting caliber DT could truly put this Dallas defensive front over the edge. With how much Defensive Coordinator Rod Marinelli believes in his DL rotation though, players like Datone Jones can prove immensely valuable.

DT Lewis Neal

Similarly to Jones, Lewis Neal is a fan-favorite defensive tackle for the Cowboys. Neal has absolutely earned the attention he's gotten, a UDFA out of LSU that plays the 1T position better than expected given his size.

The Cowboys have gotten by in recent years with smaller, more mobile players at this interior DT spot, with Neal being their latest post-draft steal to make an impact.

Lewis Neal appeared in seven games for the Cowboys this season, finding ways to help those around him by anchoring the line of scrimmage and disengaging with active hands and a quick base. This is a player that should be a valuable part of the team's depth on the defensive line.

✭ ✭ ✭ ✭ ✭

The year-to-year nature of the NFL can be a wonderful thing (unfortunately, ask any Eagles fan right now). Part of this reality is understanding that none of the players listed above may actually stick with the Dallas Cowboys for 2018.

Next week's NFL Scouting Combine will kick "draft season" into full gear however, as the Cowboys will be working to better understand their teams needs and how they can be addressed.

Jarwin, Lenoir, Jones, and Neal all contributed or showed the promise to do so at positions the Cowboys must improve at this season - warranting a closer look through this dull portion of the offseason.

Tell us what you think about "4 Depth Players to Keep in Mind on Dallas Cowboys Roster" in the comments below. You can also email me at Sean.Martin@InsideTheStar.com, or Tweet to me at @SeanMartinNFL!


Continue Reading

Dallas Cowboys

Cowboys 2018 Free Agents: RB Alfred Morris

Jess Haynie

Published

on

Alfred Morris

After two seasons of providing veteran depth for the Dallas Cowboys, running back Alfred Morris is about to be a free agent again. Does the 29-year-old still have value for the club, or will Dallas go with younger options in 2018?

Morris was signed in March of 2016. At the time, it was assumed he would be the backup to incumbent starter Darren McFadden and perhaps even split carries.

But a month later, Dallas drafted Ezekiel Elliott and drastically changed the landscape at the running back position.

If Alfred suddenly seemed expendable, that quickly changed in June when McFadden broke his elbow. Morris wound being the number-two back after all, but he was rarely used as Elliott immediately became the workhorse RB and held that role for all of his spectacular rookie season.

Last year, we all know what happened with Ezekiel Elliott. Morris became the primary RB during Zeke's suspension and had solid numbers, averaging 4.35 yards on his 99 carries during that six-week stretch.

By Week 16, though, not only had Zeke returned but Rod Smith had started to break out from the depth chart. In the Cowboys' pivotal game that week against the Seattle Seahawks, Alfred didn't even get a touch behind Elliott and Smith.

Alfred Morris

Dallas Cowboys RB Alfred Morris

Considering Smith's emergence last year, and him only being 26, it's easy to see why Dallas may not be looking to bring Alfred Morris back. They seem to have their one-two punch already set at the top of the RB depth chart.

What's more, Morris isn't likely to settle for a likely third-place role. He may not be interested in coming back to Dallas given the situation.

Thankfully for Alfred, he enters the free agent market with some good tape from 2017 showing that he can still produce. It's not a loaded crop of free agents this year and, despite his age, Morris could still find a good job somewhere. He's earned an opportunity to compete, if nothing else.

That opportunity likely won't come in Dallas, though. As I wrote about last month, the Cowboys have enough power already and need to add a speed option in their RB rotation.

That said, Alfred Morris spent the last two years giving Dallas good value for the money. He was a solid free agent pickup and his time as a Cowboy should be remembered fondly. At this point, though, I doubt that relationship will continue.


Continue Reading

Dallas Cowboys

Though Promising, We Need To Relax About Safety Kavon Frazier

Kevin Brady

Published

on

Evaluating The Future Of Kavon Frazier, Byron Jones, And The Safety Position

With the addition of former Seattle Seahawks defensive coordinator Kris Richard to the Cowboys' defensive coaching staff, fans are hoping that Dallas will create their own "Legion of Boom." Of course this is a lofty goal, but one worth pursuing nonetheless.

If the Cowboys are to recreate the Legion of Boom they will need their version of two vital pieces: Earl Thomas and Kam Chancellor.

The Seahawks defense works, in many ways, because of these two players. Thomas' ability to play centerfield and literally defend sideline to sideline gives the Seahawks the freedom to use Chancellor where he's best, as a box safety. Chancellor is a big, physical safety who defends the run effectively in the box and can blanket tight ends in man coverage with his size and athleticism.

These safeties are arguably the most critical pieces to the Legion of Boom, though having a shutdown corner in Richard Sherman certainly doesn't hurt.

Realizing Chancellor's importance, Cowboys fans are hoping that current safety Kavon Frazier can fulfill this role in Dallas. Since being drafted by the Cowboys in 2016 Frazier has made his home on Special Teams. As an impressive tackler in both punt and kick coverage, Frazier earned himself time at safety down the stretch of the 2017 season.

Kavon Frazier

S Kavon Frazier

All in all, Frazier played rather well. Against the Washington Redskins he stepped in and made a few splash plays at the line of scrimmage, causing Cowboys Nation to lose their minds. After that impressive Thursday night game, however, Kavon Frazier didn't really reach that same level of performance.

Frazier is still a liability when asked to cover, especially when asked to play as a two deep safety. He also struggles when taking angles at times, though playing downhill as a tackler is his best attribute. Frazier actually reminds me a bit of Barry Church, though over time Church became more refined in coverage than Frazier currently is.

Some have argued that Kavon Frazier's presence should stop the Cowboys from considering a first round safety. I would disagree, and actually believe that if Florida State's Derwin James is available, the Cowboys should consider making that pick.

If you could combine the athleticism and coverage abilities of Byron Jones with the physicality and "box safety" qualities of Kavon Frazier, you'd have a fantastic safety. Unfortunately, this isn't the Marvel Universe and we are left without any super heroes in the back-end.

Hopefully Kris Richard will figure out how to correctly place all of these pieces in the Dallas Cowboys secondary going forward.


Continue Reading

Reader Survey

Want to help make Inside The Star better?

We’re collecting feedback from our readers about the site. It only takes <2 minutes to complete, and can be done from any device.

> Take the survey now

Don’t worry, your information will not be shared with anyone but me (Bryson T.).




Enjoy 40% commissions on officially licensed products as a FanPrint affiliate. You can even make your own, fully licensed Cowboys and player designs! Get started here

Trending