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Reel Talk: What Can Tony Romo Still Do? The Answers From His 2015 Tape

Sean Martin

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Cowboys Headlines - Reel Talk: What Can Tony Romo Still Do? The Answers From His 2015 Tape

The 2016 Dallas Cowboys prepared to enter their season on a path towards redemption from 2015, unleashing a once-again healthy Tony Romo and Dez Bryant on the league, along with Ezekiel Elliott, to recreate their 2014 success and make a run in the playoffs.

All it took was another Romo preseason injury, and suddenly this plan seemed to have gone to waste once again. Who was going to save the season for a team that won three games with Romo last year, and just one other with a backup quarterback?

That answer became Dak Prescott, a fourth round rookie bursting onto the scene with a profound amount of confidence, leadership ability, and most importantly skill. The young quarterback is taking the league by storm, leading the Cowboys stacked offense to the top of the league right now for a team that leads the NFC East at 5-1.

Cowboys Headlines - Reel Talk: What Can Tony Romo Still Do? The Answers From His 2015 Tape 1

All of this has made some fans forget about Tony Romo, who very well may still be the better option at quarterback over the hot-handed Prescott once Romo is fully ready to play. Dak has given him the advantage of time to rest, and the piece of mind that this team will be in good hands one day, and with that Romo deserves his fair chance to lead this team in 2016.

To understand what a Tony Romo led 2016 Cowboys could look like, I watched every drop back and throw from Romo in 2015. Taking this one game at a time, I'll share my thoughts in this Reel Talk on the strengths and weaknesses I saw from Tony.

Week 1: Tony Romo Vs the New York Giants

Att Comp Pct Yds TD INT YPA
36 45 80% 356 3 2 7.9

In perhaps the signature game of the 2015 season for the Cowboys, Tony Romo came out on top in the opener against the Giants with a last second scoring strike to Jason Witten that put Dallas on the right end of a wild game.

Looking back at this game, it may now be remembered as a game where Romo was only able to dink and dunk the football down the field, never showing us the dominant quarterback play that we expected this season to bring us.

After watching the tape from this game, Romo was much more impressive. The Giants did a tremendous job of consistently taking away the deep throws with bracket coverage involving their two deep safeties. In the front seven, they tried to cover some of the conceded throws they were allowing underneath by disguising some twists and other pressure packages - but Romo was always ready for those.

Sean Martin ✭ on Twitter

1st drive of the game and 9 knew every blitz NY was throwing at him - wanted 83 underneath, forced to step up to 25. https://t.co/nmRMb1QFWg

The above play is a perfect example of Romo getting through his reads after diagnosing a blitz. He knows that the underneath throw to Terrance Williams will likely be taken away by the coverage before the snap, and checks Williams' way before having to come back and deliver a strike to Lance Dunbar to move the chains.

 

 

After getting burnt on these blitzes to open the game, the Giants changed things up on the Cowboys' second possession, attempting to bring a blitz from the secondary on this play and sitting in coverage elsewhere. Romo again sees it coming, gets the ball out of his hands before the rusher comes close, and hits Dez Bryant in the vacated area with a strong throw for another first down.

Sean Martin ✭ on Twitter

Didn't we talk about 9 throwing guys open. Another completion to 88. I'll take this element back, @CowboysAddicts.

On almost all of his completions, #9 did his absolute best to place the football in a position where his receivers and backs could make a play with it in their hands afterwards. Here you see Romo fire a pass to a breaking Bryant, who gets his head around and secures this catch going up the field for some extra yards.

 

 

Tony Romo's ability to hold defenders with his eyes and footwork in this game was still at an elite level. Before delivering this throw, Romo not only gets the Cowboys in the right protection, but he holds off a single high safety that was still backpedaling when Bryant extended for another catch over the middle - on a ball that Tony threw where only Dez could get it.

 

 

Yes, Romo did throw two interceptions in this game, and the above play was his first of the game. Escaping the pocket, he lets this short throw to Witten get away from him, as his tight end is merely able to reach behind him and leave the ball in the air for the pick.

Mistakes like these are heightened by the fact that Prescott has thrown just one interception through six games, but the rookie has put himself in position for more interceptions compared to Romo in games like these - where two interceptions ended up not costing him a chance to lead the game winning drive that he did.

Sean Martin ✭ on Twitter

This was a TD to 89.

Dak Prescott has also shown the ability to make big plays with his feet, an element to his game that is new and exciting from his position in Dallas. Romo, however, is able to do his damage through pocket mobility and awareness.

The above picture is amazing when I roll the play forward for you below. Gavin Escobar is to the right of the picture in double coverage in the end zone. A defender has a clear run at Romo, who eventually gets this ball to the patient Escobar finishing his route in the back of the end zone.

Sean Martin ✭ on Twitter

Knows this pressure is coming, slides, waits, throws 89 open brilliantly. This is my quarterback. https://t.co/PzjBHN9oTD

It is hard to compare the impact of plays like these from Romo and running plays from Prescott, as long as they are both taking care of the ball and putting up points. If Romo is still capable of what we see here though, the Cowboys and Scott Linehan need to play the veteran and try to take this offense to an even higher level.

Before we look at the final play from Romo in this game, below is his second interception, a clear mistake from now-Patriot Devin Street, who allows the ball to bounce off of his hands and pinball to a Giants' defender who returns the ball to the one.

 

 

On a much brighter note, Romo's game winning touchdown to Witten later in this game was supposed to be a moment that sparked something special for the Cowboys. Instead, hope was lost when Romo went down in the following week's game against the Eagles (which we'll break down next).

This play can still serve as an example of the all around high level of quarterback play that Tony is still capable of though, as he recognizes the single coverage across the board - bad snap and all. When he picks it up and looks around, Jason Witten in front of him is the only and best option, as he patiently waits for Witten to work his defender at the goal line.

Tony ensures that this play would end in jubilation for Cowboys Nation, waiting an extra beat to hold that linebacker on the goal line, before hitting Witten for the win.

 

Week 2: Tony Romo at the Philadelphia Eagles

Att Comp Pct Yds TD INT YPA
18 27 66.7% 195 0 0 7.2

We all know how this game ended for Tony Romo, but he did do enough to secure the win as Brandon Weeden held on in this defensive contest against the rival Eagles on the road. To do so, Romo had to once again fight through some sloppy play around him, including (surprisingly) from his offensive line.

Romo made big touch throws to the likes of Terrance Williams and Lance Dunbar in this game - making up for the absence of Dez Bryant. In this first clip, Williams does a great job of gaining inside leverage off the snap to run his deep slant route. After Tony executes his play fake, he sees Williams running free over the middle, and delivers him an absolute dart.

 


The windows were consistently tight for Romo in this game, and Scott Linehan ran a ton of plays out of his typical 11 personnel. This meant that Romo did not have the luxury of scanning the field with four or five targets like he did so well against the Giants, instead having to sometimes rely on clean pockets like this to allow him to look towards his target and place the pass perfectly.

You'll see all of that best on another big gain to Terrance Williams.

 

 

Even his last throw before exiting to injury for Brandon Weeden was an absolute dime to Lance Dunbar down the sideline, proving further that throws like these need to return to the 2016 Cowboys offense with Tony Romo.

 

 

Week 11: Tony Romo at the Miami Dolphins

Comp Att Pct Yds TD INT YPA
18 28 64.3% 227 2 2 8.1

In his first game back from injury, we saw some expected rust  from Tony Romo against the Dolphins. Fighting through this, Romo was forced into his highest yards-per-attempt of the season by some tough Miami defense, and still made the big touch throws in clutch situations to eventually snap a seven game losing streak for Dallas.

 

Romo was truly a commander of his offense in his first game back on the road, consistently changing things up at the line of scrimmage and getting his line in the right protections to give him time to throw against the Dolphins' zone coverage.

Along with this, patience was an important element of Romo's game from the pocket here, something that we have not necessarily seen from Dak Prescott. In the above play, Romo understands that his route concept will open up over the middle, and with a clean pocket he waits to thread the needle to Gavin Escobar.

 

Romo did get the win despite two interceptions, and his first turnover here was simply a bad decision and throw. Under unexpected heavy pressure, Romo quickly tries to stand in and beat the Dolphins over the top to Bryant, but the execution was poor as this throw hangs up and is lead too far inside.

 

Throwing again to Bryant under pressure in our next example, Romo uses his quick release to sling this ball perfectly to Dez out of his break. As we've noted throughout this study, this pass was put where only Bryant would catch it, and it serves as another example of the big "veteran-like" throws that Tony can bring back to the 2016 Cowboys.

 

Along with that, here is a vintage Tony Romo scramble and completion from this game. It is fair to say the Cowboys have not needed whatever Romo can bring to this team so far this season, winning 5 games with Prescott, but savvy plays like these would certainly continue to help this team win - just in a different way.

 

We've also already discussed the debate circulating around Romo bringing the deep passing element back into Scott Linehan's arsenal with the Cowboys. In this game, the Dolphins gave Romo some contested throws deep, and he was able to hit on key ones like this Terrance Williams touchdown strike. Tony climbs the pocket and rips this ball over the top to Williams, who adjusts to make a great play for the score.

The last two plays I'll show from this game are Romo's second interception followed by his second touchdown pass. On the interception below, Romo again tries to check the ball underneath but is inaccurate looking for Robert Turbin. The play is similar to the above interception from week 1 against the Giants, where Romo threw behind Jason Witten.

 

A mistake like this from a veteran player can only be made up for with individual effort, and Romo certainly gave Dallas plenty of that later in the game by responding with plays like this Dez Bryant touchdown. Below, you'll see Romo recognize another blitz, which is picked up by Zack Martin. Once he has time to get through his reads, Romo looks for Bryant to vacate the open area working out of the slot left by the blitzing defender, and drops this throw in the bucket once he does for a pivotal score.

 

Week 12: Tony Romo Vs the Carolina Panthers

Comp Att Pct Yds TD INT YPA
11 21 52.4% 106 0 3 5

We've reached this game. Thanksgiving 2015 is the last time we saw Tony Romo in the regular season, and still shaking off rust after Sunday's return in Miami, Romo played what was likely the worst game of his career on the short week. Against the eventual NFC Champion Carolina Panthers, Romo was never able to get a step ahead, constantly being beaten by the speed of this defense - eventually succumbing to some indecisiveness and second-guessing that showed on the tape via missed easy throws into closing windows.

Romo's first interception came on just his second passing attempt, as he never sees this safety breaking on what would otherwise be an open second read after Beasley was covered.

 

The same can be said about Romo's second interception to all-world linebacker Luke Kuechly (who actually picked off Romo on consecutive plays following this to complete the hat trick of turnovers for Tony prior to his season-ending injury).

Romo thinks that he has Kuechly committed to carrying Jason Witten up the seam, and if he was any other linebacker, Romo is likely correct. Instead, he is able to range over to pick off this pass at the hashes and return it for a score.

In between these disastrous plays from Romo, there was some good to take away from this game. The two rhythm throws to Cole Beasley below can serve as reasons for excitement if Romo returns to a 2016 team that is seeing Beasley thrive under Dak Prescott - mostly in the absence of Dez Bryant.

 

In the end, Dak Prescott supporters will still quickly cite this game in an attempt to strengthen their case for sticking with the rookie by degrading the veteran Romo. Specifically, they'll likely bring up this third and final interception from Romo into the hands of Kuechly. #9 simply forced this throw, and tested a player that should not have been, one that was able to make him pay.

 

Final Thoughts on Tony Romo in 2015

Getting a chance to closely study Tony Romo from the previous season was really a fascinating exercise. Let's be real, the first takeaway I had was that Romo is a slightly lesser player than he was in 2014. 

With that said, the simple things that Romo was able to execute in 2015 were impressive, as well as good enough to reasonably believe he could have the 2016 version of the Cowboys offense playing at the same level they are currently.

Tony Romo does not have much time left, and I love everything that Dak Prescott has been able to do (with ease) through six games under center for the Dallas Cowboys. It may not be as clean when Romo gets his chance to step in, but I still believe he needs that chance, and that with it he will simply get the job done as always.

Dallas' running game will thrive with Romo and his experience - allowing him to get the ball to Ezekiel Elliott in the perfect opportunities. Dez Bryant is going to be ready to go, and suddenly the 2016 Cowboys may resemble a super-charged 2014 team.

Not only will they have a chance to be the 2014 team that made a playoff run with Tony Romo once again at quarterback, but they will be a team with a present and a future - with that future waiting on the sidelines being Dak Prescott.

Let's all enjoy the fact that Dallas should be on the brink of a special run over the next few years. If that run starts in 2016, this lengthy film study has me believing that it starts and ends with Antonio Ramiro Romo.

 

For much more on this topic, check out my case for Tony Romo on the RJ Ochoa Show. Fellow Staff Writer Jess Haynie made his case for Dak Prescott, with Staff Writer RJ Ochoa serving as the host and moderator.

To view all of these clips, along with more analysis that did not make this article, check me out on Twitter @ShoreSportsNJ! 

You can also use the comments section below to share your thoughts on this film study, and if Romo or Prescott should start. I can also be reached via email at Sean.Martin@InsideTheStar.com.

Tell us what you think about "Reel Talk: What Can Tony Romo Still Do? The Answers From His 2015 Tape" in the comments below. You can also email me at Sean.Martin@InsideTheStar.com, or Tweet to me at @SeanMartinNFL!



Born January 28th, 1996- Cowboys Super Bowl XXX. Point Boro Panther, Montclair State Red Hawk, and most importantly a proud member of Cowboys Nation! I host "Upon Further Review" on 90.3 WMSC FM and wmscradio.com every Friday from 1-4 PM ET. Twitter: @SeanMartinNFL.

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Michael Jackson Could Make Things Interesting at Nickel Corner

Matthew Lenix

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Michael Jackson Could Make Things Interesting at Nickel Corner

In a passing league, you can never have too many bodies in your secondary. By the fifth round of the NFL Draft in April, the Dallas Cowboys had addressed both their offensive and defensive lines, as well as the backup running back position. It was time to add more depth at cornerback and with the 158th pick Michael Jackson was selected.

Currently Anthony Brown has the inside track to be the lead dog at that Nickel Cornerback, but his play has dropped off before in the past. Jourdan Lewis is right behind him still trying to find his place in the team's defensive system. Jackson is in the perfect position to make his move up the depth chart, and here are a few reasons why.

First, he has all the measurables needed to succeed in the Cowboys defensive scheme. At 6'1 210 pounds, with a 40.5-inch vertical, 32.5-inch arms and 4.4 speed he's definitely an early Christmas present for Defensive Coordinator Rod Marinelli, and more specifically Defensive Backs Coach and Passing Game Coordinator Kris Richard. Long and physical corners are what built the infamous "Legion of Boom" in Seattle under his watch.

His ability to be effective in press coverage is a huge tool in his bag. He does an excellent job jamming receivers at the line of scrimmage. So much so, that quarterbacks only completed 5 out of 18 passes on go routes against Jackson last season at Miami. Good for a passer rating of 54.4 and a completion percentage of 27.7, with no touchdowns allowed.

Lastly, his versatility brings his skill set full circle. In addition to playing in the slot, he can also line up on the outside. This gives the Cowboys insurance if something catastrophic happens to the team's starters Byron Jones and Chido Awuzie. It doesn't stop there, however, as his stature gives him the added bonus of transferring to safety if need be. So many possibilities to work with.

The rookie hasn't wasted time impressing Kris Richard as the preparations for the upcoming season have kicked off.

"Very pleased with him. Intelligent. Picks up a lot of things quick. I think he's got corner and nickel combo ability for us. Obviously, the more you can do, the more value you present for yourself," Richard said.

As training camp approaches, Michael Jackson has his opportunity to compete. Every snap must be played like it's his last if he wants to be a big contributor in 2019. There's no lack of skill, only experience, and reps, which he'll get plenty of in late July until the season starts. The stage is set for him to possibly add his name next to starting Free Safety Xavier Woods as another late round steal for the Cowboys secondary.



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Michael Gallup is Primed for Breakout Sophomore Season

Matthew Lenix

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Michael Gallup is Primed for Breakout Sophomore Season 1

Heading into the 2018 season the Dallas Cowboys had big questions at the wide receiver position with the departure of Dez Bryant. They elected not to go for the flashy names like Maryland's D.J. Moore or Alabama's Calvin Ridley, but instead took Colorado State Wide Receiver, Michael Gallup 81st overall.

Even without the hype of other bigger named receivers coming out of college, Gallup's resume was enough to impress Head Coach Jason Garrett. "There's a lot to like about him. He's big, he's athletic, he plays the game the right way. He's been a productive player for them, doing a lot of different kinds of things. We feel like he has real upside, too. A lot of qualities that you want in a young receiver, in a developmental receiver. But a lot of production, too. He had opportunities there and took advantage of them throughout his career," Garrett said.

Once the season started, however, it was apparent that it would take some time to build the chemistry and trust with Quarterback Dak Prescott. The lack of a true number one receiver wasn't doing the first talent any favors as he tried to figure out his role on the team. Gallup would be targeted just 15 times in the first 5 games, only registering 6 receptions. But fortunately for the newbie, help was on the way.

During the team's bye week in October, they acquired Amari Cooper from the Raiders in exchange for a first-round pick in the 2019 draft, and it worked wonders for Gallup and his development. Weeks 11 through 14 saw him targetted 27 times. This was significant considering the Cowboys were in the midst of a 5-game winning streak after a 3-5 start. Prescott's trust and belief in Gallup were starting to come together as the team made a run at the NFC East crown and a playoff berth.

He would finish with 33 receptions for 507 yards and 2 touchdowns. Once the postseason rolled around Gallup had firmly established himself as the team's second option behind Amari Cooper.

Gallup would make his first playoff start in the divisional round against the Rams in Los Angeles. Although the Cowboys season wouldn't survive this contest, one of the positives was the play of the first year pass catcher. He finished with 6 receptions for 119 yards, and a tidal wave of momentum heading into 2019.

There's a major change coming to the Cowboys offensive philosophy this season, thanks to newly promoted Offensive Coordinator Kellen Moore. The new puppet master of the offense has made it clear he's open to listening to suggestions from the players and staff on what they feel will take the offense into another orbit. "At the end of the day, work together with everyone. I think that includes the coaching staff, obviously coach Garrett and the rest of his staff. I think you also got to get some input from the players. It doesn't mean you have to go down those roads all the time, but I think it's important that when a player believes in something and they're pretty convinced on it, usually they find a way to make it work," Kellen Moore said.

With a season already under his belt with Prescott, and an open-minded first-year offensive coordinator willing to abandon the prehistoric ways of the Scott Linehan era, Gallup's development will only improve with each snap.

Unlike the beginning of his rookie season, Michael Gallup knows exactly what his role with the Cowboys is going forward. Amari Cooper is the main option, and with him drawing double teams regularly, the opportunities for Gallup to have a major impact in year two are endless. Not to mention, the added addition of Randall Cobb to the Cowboys passing game just made life even easier for him. Now teams not only have to roll coverage to Cooper, but the threat of Cobb in the slot creates a lot of one-on-ones on the outside for Gallup.

The size, speed, and athleticism are all there for this young man. Now, with a more innovative offensive scheme coming into play, and growing trust between himself and Dak Prescott, the 2019 season is shaping up to make Michael Gallup a household name.



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Is Amari Cooper the Most Important Contract for Cowboys to Finalize?

John Williams

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Amari Cooper has Final Say on Trade Compensation in Cowboys Win 3

Most of the offseason contract chatter, once DeMarcus Lawrence's contract was signed, began to focus on the next group of stars due for big-time money, most notably Quarterback Dak Prescott. For good reason as the quarterback is generally regarded as the most important player on the team. While Prescott has been important to the team's success over the last three seasons, few players made as much of an impact on the 2018 Dallas Cowboys than Amari Cooper.

The Dallas Cowboys front office is working on deals for Prescott and Cooper. Both will get new contracts at some point before they're scheduled to hit free agency in March of 2020, but one could argue that getting Amari Cooper's deal done is more important than Dak Prescott's.

Prior to the arrival of Amari Cooper, the Dallas Cowboys offense struggled and was inconsistent. In the seven games prior to the trade that brought Cooper to Dallas, the Cowboys went 3-4 and scored more than 20 points only three times. In wins over the New York Giants, Detroit Lions, and Jacksonville Jaguars they averaged 28.67 points per game, highlighted by a 40 point outburst against the Jaguars in week six. In their four losses on the season they averaged 13.5 points per game. Over the first seven games, they averaged 20 points per game.

In the nine games, the Dallas Cowboys played with Amari Cooper, the Cowboys averaged 22 points per game. They scored more than 20 points in all but three games; losses to the Tennessee Titans and Indianapolis Colts and a win over the New Orleans Saints.

If you remove the 40 point game against the Jaguars from the scoring average over the first seven games and the shutout loss to the Colts from the scoring average over the final nine games, the scoring average changes dramatically. Without the Jaguars game, the Cowboys only averaged 16.67 points per game in the other six contests, decreasing their scoring average by more than three points per game. Conversely, if you remove the shutout loss to the Colts from the scoring average over the last nine games, the Cowboys averaged 24.87 points per game. That's nearly a three-point difference.

Even if you remove the best (week 17 against the Giants) and worst (week 15 against the Colts) games of the final nine games from the scoring average, the Cowboys averaged 23.3 points per game. removing the best (week six against the Jaguars) and worst (week one against the Panthers) games from the first half of the season, the Dallas Cowboys averaged only 18.4 points per game in the other five games.

So Amari Cooper was worth between two and 4.9 points per game. That may not seem like a lot, but that's a huge difference in a league where so many games come down to a single score.

Amari Cooper has Final Say on Trade Compensation in Cowboys Win 1The impact offense as a whole is noticeable, but what about on Dak Prescott.

Dak Prescott only averaged 202 passing yards per game and had a passer rating of 87.4 with eight touchdown passes and four interceptions in the first seven games prior to Amari Cooper's arrival. Prescott only completed 62.14% of his passes in the first seven games of the season.

Over the final nine games of the season, Dak averaged 274 passing yards a game, threw for 14 touchdowns and only threw four interceptions. Prescott had a passer rating of 103 and completed 71% of his passes.

In the first half of the season, Prescott only had a passer rating over 100 two times, while he had a passer rating under 90 three times. Over the final nine games with Amari, Prescott had a passer rating over 100 six times and had only two games with a passer rating under 90.

Not only did Amari Cooper make a significant impact on the passing game, but the running game led by Ezekiel Elliott saw a dramatic increase in his production once Amari Cooper arrived.

In the first seven games of the season, Ezekiel Elliott averaged only 19 carries a game and 88.4 yards rushing per game. He was averaging 4.69 yards per carry. Through the air, Elliott caught 3.6 passes per game for only 25 yards with seven yards per reception.

After Cooper's arrival, Elliott got more opportunities and found more room to run as well. he averaged 21.5 carries per game, rushed for 101.9 yards per game. He more than doubled his receptions per game with 6.5 and averaged 49 yards receiving per game, nearly doubling his first half of the season totals.

It's no coincidence that the run and pass games saw increased production after bringing in one of the better young receivers in the NFL. The overall impact of Amari Cooper led to the Dallas Cowboys going on a 7-2 run to finish the season to win the NFC East. Prior to the trade, the team looked dead in the water. After the trade Dak Prescott looked like a completely different quarterback. The team was hitting big plays, converting on third downs, and scoring tons of points on the way to winning lots of games.

Dak Prescott is going to get his contract finalized, of that, I have no doubt. While I feel good about his upward trajectory as a player, I feel a lot better about it knowing that Amari Cooper is about to get a contract too.

Amari Cooper is an excellent talent. His route running precision makes opposing defensive backs look foolish and the separation he creates makes a quarterback's job that much easier. Cooper is like having Cole Beasley in Dez Bryant's body with sub-4.4 speed.

Just turning 25 years old, Amari Cooper is one of the bright young stars at the wide receiver position and is about to enter his prime. Unlike players like Dez Bryant, who rely on physicality and athleticism, Cooper is going to age much more gracefully as route running is one of those things that doesn't drop off near as quickly as athleticism. Just look at Jason Witten.

The Dallas Cowboys need to not mess around with Amari Cooper. Because having him for his prime and for the same timeframe that you are extending your franchise quarterback will make the next six years of their respective careers much more productive. The best way to take care of your franchise quarterback is to give him an offensive line to protect him. The second best way is to give him a wide receiver that can get open for him.

Amari Cooper is a quarterback's best friend and will be worth every penny he gets in a contract extension. In the Cowboys 2018 run to the playoffs, there were few players as important to that success as Amari Cooper. In this offseason of contract extensions and signings, few still, are as important to the Cowboys success as Amari Cooper.

Get him signed, so he can go play football.



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