Connect with us

Dallas Cowboys

Running Back Isn’t a Big Need

Jess Haynie

Published

on

Staff Blog - Staff Wars: Cowboys Must Stay With Darren McFadden

I seem to be in the minority when it comes to my analysis of the Cowboys' running back position. All around me are people clamoring for a big free agent signing or a high draft pick, even the fourth overall, to add more ball-carrying talent. I'm not on the same page with most of you.

Let's set the table with some facts, shall we?

  • Darren McFadden was the 4th-leading in the NFL last year, only 27 yards behind Todd Gurley at #3.
  • McFadden was a backup for one-third of the season, getting just about seven carries per game until taking over in Week 6.
  • As a team, the Cowboys had the 9th-best total rushing yardage and 5th-best yards-per-carry.
  • This strong rushing production came despite the absence of a passing threat in our offense.

Somehow, McFadden's value is getting summarily dismissed.  Fans are overly focused on the shiny new cars on the lot and have, in my opinion, lost perspective on just much actual need there is at the position. Given Dallas' issues throughout the roster, people need to take a step back and consider just where resources will be best spent.

Now I can buy some arguments against trusting McFadden. As a Raider his career was marked with strong years followed by injury-plagued ones. McFadden got more touches in 2015 than in any other season and turns 29 in August. There is legitimate cause for concern.

But where I see a need for some added insurance, others are wanting a total overhaul of a position. They perceive necessity where I'm seeing luxury.

Free Agency

Cowboys Headlines - Running Back Isn't a Big NeedI can understand the attractiveness of signing a guy like Miami's Lamar Miller. He turns just 25 in April and has a skill set that seems to suit our offense well. But Miller will be one of the top two free agent running backs in next week's market along with Doug Martin, driving his price way up. Is that money well spent?

Another name you hear a lot is Matt Forte from Chicago. He's a year-and-a-half older than McFadden and wasn't nearly as productive last year. Why is he an upgrade?

This isn't to say Dallas doesn't need free agents. I'd be all for adding someone like Alfred Morris or Bobby Rainey, guys who will come at a discount for the production they could offer if needed. I'd even be okay if Dallas wanted to bring back Robert Turbin for that role.

Where I can get on board is the notion that we have to upgrade from McFadden. He put up top-five production in two-thirds of the time. Cowboys game broadcasts are some of the highest-rated in the whole NFL, so how come nobody else saw it?

The Draft

The other big push for an upgrade is draft-focused, with some even suggesting Dallas should use their fourth-overall pick on a running back. No matter how much you like some of this year's prospects, the history of highly-drafted running backs should concern you.

In the last ten years only Trent Richardson, Reggie Bush, and our own McFadden were taken in the top five. None of them ever lived up to that status.

If we expand to the Top 10 then the list includes Adrian Peterson, C.J. Spiller, and Todd Gurley. Peterson has certainly lived up and Gurley had a fantastic rookie year. But overall that's just 33% success rate on running backs taken in the Top 10, and that's only if we assume Gurley is going to remain a star player.

Cowboys Headlines - Running Back Isn't a Big Need 1You're not wrong if you like what Ezekiel Elliott or some other top prospect offers. However, you have to look back at that list of disappointments and remember that they were all "future stars" at one point. The odds that one of these guys will be the next Adrian Peterson are far slimmer than draft hype and excitement lead you to believe.

To be fair, one reason for the low success rate is that the teams drafting guys in the Top 10 are usually not very good. They may not have the best offensive lines or passing games to allow these young runners to thrive. Dallas is in a unique position because Tony Romo's injury forced them down the standings despite having a solid infrastructure.

If top defensive prospects like Jalen Ramsey or Joey Bosa are taken in the top three then I can live with Dallas trading down to snag a running back in the first round. It would be the ultimate insurance policy against a down year for McFadden and set you up nicely for the future. But it certainly shouldn't be "Plan A" for their draft approach given other roster needs.

Buyer Beware

Bottom line; McFadden isn't getting the respect his 2015 performance deserves. Given our issues and needs on defense, we need to be careful how we spend cap space and use draft picks elsewhere. Luxuries are great when you can afford them, but Dallas isn't all that luxurious right now.

"Buyer beware" is often said when it comes to the quality of the intended purchase but can also be said about the responsibility of the buyer. Desperation after a down year can lead to mistakes. New found financial flexibility can cause reversion to old habits, spending too much in the present without an eye on the future.

The Cowboys can't go back to their old ways. Otherwise, you can plan on the same old results.



Cowboys fan since 1992, blogger since 2011. Bringing you the objectivity of an outside perspective with the passion of a die-hard fan. I love to talk to my readers, so please comment on any article and I'll be sure to respond!

Advertisement
Comments

Player News

Michael Gallup is Primed for Breakout Sophomore Season

Matthew Lenix

Published

on

Michael Gallup is Primed for Breakout Sophomore Season 1

Heading into the 2018 season the Dallas Cowboys had big questions at the wide receiver position with the departure of Dez Bryant. They elected not to go for the flashy names like Maryland's D.J. Moore or Alabama's Calvin Ridley, but instead took Colorado State Wide Receiver, Michael Gallup 81st overall.

Even without the hype of other bigger named receivers coming out of college, Gallup's resume was enough to impress Head Coach Jason Garrett. "There's a lot to like about him. He's big, he's athletic, he plays the game the right way. He's been a productive player for them, doing a lot of different kinds of things. We feel like he has real upside, too. A lot of qualities that you want in a young receiver, in a developmental receiver. But a lot of production, too. He had opportunities there and took advantage of them throughout his career," Garrett said.

Once the season started, however, it was apparent that it would take some time to build the chemistry and trust with Quarterback Dak Prescott. The lack of a true number one receiver wasn't doing the first talent any favors as he tried to figure out his role on the team. Gallup would be targeted just 15 times in the first 5 games, only registering 6 receptions. But fortunately for the newbie, help was on the way.

During the team's bye week in October, they acquired Amari Cooper from the Raiders in exchange for a first-round pick in the 2019 draft, and it worked wonders for Gallup and his development. Weeks 11 through 14 saw him targetted 27 times. This was significant considering the Cowboys were in the midst of a 5-game winning streak after a 3-5 start. Prescott's trust and belief in Gallup were starting to come together as the team made a run at the NFC East crown and a playoff berth.

He would finish with 33 receptions for 507 yards and 2 touchdowns. Once the postseason rolled around Gallup had firmly established himself as the team's second option behind Amari Cooper.

Gallup would make his first playoff start in the divisional round against the Rams in Los Angeles. Although the Cowboys season wouldn't survive this contest, one of the positives was the play of the first year pass catcher. He finished with 6 receptions for 119 yards, and a tidal wave of momentum heading into 2019.

There's a major change coming to the Cowboys offensive philosophy this season, thanks to newly promoted Offensive Coordinator Kellen Moore. The new puppet master of the offense has made it clear he's open to listening to suggestions from the players and staff on what they feel will take the offense into another orbit. "At the end of the day, work together with everyone. I think that includes the coaching staff, obviously coach Garrett and the rest of his staff. I think you also got to get some input from the players. It doesn't mean you have to go down those roads all the time, but I think it's important that when a player believes in something and they're pretty convinced on it, usually they find a way to make it work," Kellen Moore said.

With a season already under his belt with Prescott, and an open-minded first-year offensive coordinator willing to abandon the prehistoric ways of the Scott Linehan era, Gallup's development will only improve with each snap.

Unlike the beginning of his rookie season, Michael Gallup knows exactly what his role with the Cowboys is going forward. Amari Cooper is the main option, and with him drawing double teams regularly, the opportunities for Gallup to have a major impact in year two are endless. Not to mention, the added addition of Randall Cobb to the Cowboys passing game just made life even easier for him. Now teams not only have to roll coverage to Cooper, but the threat of Cobb in the slot creates a lot of one-on-ones on the outside for Gallup.

The size, speed, and athleticism are all there for this young man. Now, with a more innovative offensive scheme coming into play, and growing trust between himself and Dak Prescott, the 2019 season is shaping up to make Michael Gallup a household name.



Continue Reading

Dallas Cowboys

Cowboys Late-Round Rookies Will Struggle to Make 2019 Roster

Jess Haynie

Published

on

Jalen Jelks

Being picked in the later rounds of the NFL Draft is no guarantee of a roster spot, but the Dallas Cowboys have had a good run lately of finding talent on Day 3. For this 2019 class, however, even talent may not be enough. The success of past drafts has loaded the roster and will make it hard for this year's late-round rookies to get through final cuts.

Starting with CB Michael Jackson and DE Joe Jackson in the fifth round, these newcomers may be hoping just to make the practice squad in 2019. The group includes S Donovan Wilson, RB Mike Weber, and DE Jalen Jelks.

Over the past few years, Dallas has found some significant contributors with their Day 3 draftees. Safety Xavier Woods and CB Anthony Brown, both 6th-round picks, should have major roles in the secondary this year. Geoff Swaim, a former 7th-rounder, was the starting TE last year before suffering an injury.

Another 6th-round Safety, Kavon Frazier, has been a solid reserve and special teamer for three seasons. RB Darius Jackson and TE Rico Gathers are also still here from that 2016 draft and competing for jobs. So is WR Noah Brown, a 2017 7th-round pick.

But also with these successes have come plenty of failed picks.

Going back to just 2017, only Brown and Woods remain from the five players drafted in those last two rounds. CB Marquez White and DTs Joey Ivie and Jordan Carrell didn't last long, and only Ivie remains in the NFL (Kansas City) at this time.

This new crop of 2019 rookies has an even taller order than those past draft classes. They're up against the good picks from recent years, who still have youth and cheap contracts but also a few years of valuable experience. It's the best of both worlds for the Cowboys, but a daunting hurdle for this year's rookies to get over.

Do Tony Pollard or Mike Weber Have Starting Potential?

Dallas Cowboys RB Mike Weber

Of the players drafted in the 5th-7th rounds in 2019, RB Mike Weber has the best shot at making the 53-man roster. The Cowboys didn't keep Rod Smith or sign any other veterans to back up Ezekiel Elliott, creating open competition throughout the remainder of the depth chart.

One spot will go to 4th-round rookie Tony Pollard, who should at least be a gadget player and return specialist if not the primary backup. But Weber has a good chance of being the third man, competing with similarly inexperienced players like Darius Jackson and Jordan Chunn.

The key for Weber may simply be staying healthy. Injuries were an issue for him in college and he already had his first professional scare with a knee injury during mini-camp, which thankfully came back benign. However, more missed time could have Dallas looking for a more reliable option.

One scenario which could hurt Weber's chances is the possibility that the Cowboys keep just Elliott and Pollard on the 53, then utilize fullback Jamize Olawale as an emergency third RB. With his proven offensive skills from the Raiders, Olawale could get them through a game in a pinch. Zeke's durability makes this an acceptable risk.

If that happens, Weber, Jackson, or Chunn will be hoping to stick around on the practice squad and be ready in case of an injury. It would still be a positive outcome for a 7th-round pick like Weber, but it's not the same as making the official roster.

Donovan Wilson

Dallas Cowboys safety Donovan Wilson

The player with the next-best odds of making the team this year is Safety Donovan Wilson, who many considered a steal in the sixth round. With Kavon Frazier entering the final year of his rookie deal, Dallas might be willing to cut him loose and go with the younger player with a fresh, new four-year contract.

But even if the Cowboys like Wilson over Frazier, he's also got to worry about Darian Thompson. Taken in the 3rd round of the 2016 draft by the Giants, Thompson may have higher upside and has already been getting work in practice before Frazier, Wilson, or other safety prospects.

The situation is even worse for other rookies.

Michael Jackson has to hope that the Cowboys either keep more than four cornerbacks, which they didn't last year or that Jourdan Lewis gets traded. He also has to worry about Donovan Olumba, who nearly made the team last year and is back with a season of practice squad experience.

Joe Jackson is also feeling a number crunch at defensive end, as is 7th-round pick, Jalen Jelks. The Cowboys have loaded up at DE this year, adding veteran Robert Quinn and Kerry Hyder to the returning cast of DeMarcus Lawrence, Taco Charlton, and Dorance Armstrong. There's also Randy Gregory still floating around out there, hoping for reinstatement before the season begins.

One idea I've seen floated is that Jelks could get converted to strong-side linebacker, in the mold of former Dallas roleplayer Kyle Wilber (credit to @KDDrummondNFL). This would make a lot of sense given Jelks' physical makeup and the opportunity at LB, where he'd be competing with Chris Covington for the sixth roster spot.

~ ~ ~

All of these players will have an opportunity. They weren't drafted for nothing; Dallas will inherently root for them after investing picks to acquire them. But a spot with this team, or even in the league, is far from guaranteed for any late-round rookies.

Will someone from this group emerge as the next Xavier Woods? Or will they join the many who spent only one or two offseasons with the team and then quickly faded from memory?

Every year's rookies face this question, but this 2019 group will have a harder time than most of avoiding the discard pile.



Continue Reading

Player News

Is Amari Cooper the Most Important Contract for Cowboys to Finalize?

John Williams

Published

on

Amari Cooper has Final Say on Trade Compensation in Cowboys Win 3

Most of the offseason contract chatter, once DeMarcus Lawrence's contract was signed, began to focus on the next group of stars due for big-time money, most notably Quarterback Dak Prescott. For good reason as the quarterback is generally regarded as the most important player on the team. While Prescott has been important to the team's success over the last three seasons, few players made as much of an impact on the 2018 Dallas Cowboys than Amari Cooper.

The Dallas Cowboys front office is working on deals for Prescott and Cooper. Both will get new contracts at some point before they're scheduled to hit free agency in March of 2020, but one could argue that getting Amari Cooper's deal done is more important than Dak Prescott's.

Prior to the arrival of Amari Cooper, the Dallas Cowboys offense struggled and was inconsistent. In the seven games prior to the trade that brought Cooper to Dallas, the Cowboys went 3-4 and scored more than 20 points only three times. In wins over the New York Giants, Detroit Lions, and Jacksonville Jaguars they averaged 28.67 points per game, highlighted by a 40 point outburst against the Jaguars in week six. In their four losses on the season they averaged 13.5 points per game. Over the first seven games, they averaged 20 points per game.

In the nine games, the Dallas Cowboys played with Amari Cooper, the Cowboys averaged 22 points per game. They scored more than 20 points in all but three games; losses to the Tennessee Titans and Indianapolis Colts and a win over the New Orleans Saints.

If you remove the 40 point game against the Jaguars from the scoring average over the first seven games and the shutout loss to the Colts from the scoring average over the final nine games, the scoring average changes dramatically. Without the Jaguars game, the Cowboys only averaged 16.67 points per game in the other six contests, decreasing their scoring average by more than three points per game. Conversely, if you remove the shutout loss to the Colts from the scoring average over the last nine games, the Cowboys averaged 24.87 points per game. That's nearly a three-point difference.

Even if you remove the best (week 17 against the Giants) and worst (week 15 against the Colts) games of the final nine games from the scoring average, the Cowboys averaged 23.3 points per game. removing the best (week six against the Jaguars) and worst (week one against the Panthers) games from the first half of the season, the Dallas Cowboys averaged only 18.4 points per game in the other five games.

So Amari Cooper was worth between two and 4.9 points per game. That may not seem like a lot, but that's a huge difference in a league where so many games come down to a single score.

Amari Cooper has Final Say on Trade Compensation in Cowboys Win 1The impact offense as a whole is noticeable, but what about on Dak Prescott.

Dak Prescott only averaged 202 passing yards per game and had a passer rating of 87.4 with eight touchdown passes and four interceptions in the first seven games prior to Amari Cooper's arrival. Prescott only completed 62.14% of his passes in the first seven games of the season.

Over the final nine games of the season, Dak averaged 274 passing yards a game, threw for 14 touchdowns and only threw four interceptions. Prescott had a passer rating of 103 and completed 71% of his passes.

In the first half of the season, Prescott only had a passer rating over 100 two times, while he had a passer rating under 90 three times. Over the final nine games with Amari, Prescott had a passer rating over 100 six times and had only two games with a passer rating under 90.

Not only did Amari Cooper make a significant impact on the passing game, but the running game led by Ezekiel Elliott saw a dramatic increase in his production once Amari Cooper arrived.

In the first seven games of the season, Ezekiel Elliott averaged only 19 carries a game and 88.4 yards rushing per game. He was averaging 4.69 yards per carry. Through the air, Elliott caught 3.6 passes per game for only 25 yards with seven yards per reception.

After Cooper's arrival, Elliott got more opportunities and found more room to run as well. he averaged 21.5 carries per game, rushed for 101.9 yards per game. He more than doubled his receptions per game with 6.5 and averaged 49 yards receiving per game, nearly doubling his first half of the season totals.

It's no coincidence that the run and pass games saw increased production after bringing in one of the better young receivers in the NFL. The overall impact of Amari Cooper led to the Dallas Cowboys going on a 7-2 run to finish the season to win the NFC East. Prior to the trade, the team looked dead in the water. After the trade Dak Prescott looked like a completely different quarterback. The team was hitting big plays, converting on third downs, and scoring tons of points on the way to winning lots of games.

Dak Prescott is going to get his contract finalized, of that, I have no doubt. While I feel good about his upward trajectory as a player, I feel a lot better about it knowing that Amari Cooper is about to get a contract too.

Amari Cooper is an excellent talent. His route running precision makes opposing defensive backs look foolish and the separation he creates makes a quarterback's job that much easier. Cooper is like having Cole Beasley in Dez Bryant's body with sub-4.4 speed.

Just turning 25 years old, Amari Cooper is one of the bright young stars at the wide receiver position and is about to enter his prime. Unlike players like Dez Bryant, who rely on physicality and athleticism, Cooper is going to age much more gracefully as route running is one of those things that doesn't drop off near as quickly as athleticism. Just look at Jason Witten.

The Dallas Cowboys need to not mess around with Amari Cooper. Because having him for his prime and for the same timeframe that you are extending your franchise quarterback will make the next six years of their respective careers much more productive. The best way to take care of your franchise quarterback is to give him an offensive line to protect him. The second best way is to give him a wide receiver that can get open for him.

Amari Cooper is a quarterback's best friend and will be worth every penny he gets in a contract extension. In the Cowboys 2018 run to the playoffs, there were few players as important to that success as Amari Cooper. In this offseason of contract extensions and signings, few still, are as important to the Cowboys success as Amari Cooper.

Get him signed, so he can go play football.



Continue Reading



Enjoy 40% commissions on officially licensed products as a FanPrint affiliate. You can even make your own, fully licensed Cowboys and player designs! Get started here

Trending