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Dallas Cowboys Player Profile: WR #11 Cole Beasley 1


Cole Beasley, #11

#11 Cole Beasley

Height: 5-8 Weight: 180 Age: 27
Position: Wide Receiver College: Southern Methodist (SMU)
Exp: 5 Years

Cole Beasley was born in Houston, Texas on April 26, 1989. He played his college football at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. He is a wide receiver in the NFL for the Dallas Cowboys, who signed him as an undrafted free agent in 2012.

Dallas Cowboys Player Profile: WR #11 Cole Beasley 1

High School

Dallas Cowboys Player Profile: WR #11 Cole Beasley 2Cole Beasley attended Little Elm High School, which is located in Denton County, Texas, just a few minutes down the road from the Dallas Cowboys headquarters in Frisco, Texas. He was a two-sport athlete in high school, playing both basketball and football. It was on the football field where Beasley made a name for himself, though.

Cole Beasley was an option quarterback while at Little Elm High School and led his team to the Texas UI L 4A playoffs in consecutive years. He was a district Co-MVP, and posted 1,184 rushing yards and scored 12 touchdowns on 157 carries. He threw for 1,570 passing yards and 12 touchdowns, while also intercepting three passes on defense.

Cole Beasley was rated as a two-star recruit by Rivals.com and Scout.com coming out of high school. He ended up receiving offers from both Southern Methodist University and the Air Force, but eventually committed to SMU.

Beasley had his jersey retired at Little Elm High School in 2012 and was in attendance to watch Little Elm beat Frisco Liberty 49-14.

“It’s an honor to have your jersey retired from any place really,” Beasley said prior to the ceremony. “It’s a great opportunity to go back to my high school, and hopefully they appreciate me a little bit more and don’t hate me.”

College/NCAA

Dallas Cowboys Player Profile: WR #11 Cole BeasleyAfter finishing his high school career at Little Elm in Denton County, Texas, Cole Beasley decided to continue his football career and accepted a scholarship to Southern Methodist University. Although Beasley was an option quarterback in high school, the coaching staff at SMU decided to convert him from QB to wide receiver.

As a freshman in 2008, Cole Beasley played in 11 games and started seven of those contests. He ended the season ranked third on the team with 42 catches for 366 receiving yards and three touchdowns.

In 2009 as a sophomore, Cole Beasley once again started seven games and played in a total of 12. He ended the season ranked fourth on the team with 40 catches for 493 receiving yards and three touchdowns. Beasley’s contribution as a wide receiver helped the Mustangs win the 2009 Hawaii Bowl, which marks the first bowl invite since the so-called “death penalty” or “Ponygate”.

Ponygate refers to the incident in which the football program at SMU was investigated and punished for numerous violations of NCAA rules and regulations. These violations occurred from the mid-1970s through 1986. The severity of the penalty handed down to SMU by the NCAA is still one of the most severe penalties handed down to a Division I collegiate program.

As a junior, Cole Beasley started all 14 games at receiver and caught 87 passes for 1,060 receiving yards and six touchdowns. His 1,060 receiving yards was the fourth highest single-season total in school history, and his 87 catches rank second for a single-season in the program’s history. Beasley also returned both a punt and a kickoff for a touchdown in the 2010 season. He ended up being named to the Second Team All-Conference USA based on his performance as a junior.

In 2011, Beasley’s senior year, he started all 12 games and led the team with 86 catches for 1,040 receiving yards (second on the team) and scored two touchdowns.

2012 NFL Draft

Upon the completion of his collegiate career at SMU, Cole Beasley unfortunately didn’t get to hear his name called in any of the seven rounds of the 2012 NFL Draft because of concerns about his size, or lack thereof. The Dallas Cowboys decided to sign him as an undrafted free agent and gave him his chance to continue his football career as a professional in the NFL.

NFL Career

Dallas Cowboys Player Profile: WR #11 Cole Beasley 3

In training camp, Cole Beasley left abruptly because of what he stated as having to deal with “personal stuff” and even contemplated retiring from professional football altogether. He ended up having a change of heart and returned to the team, eventually making the final 53 man roster.

As a rookie in 2012, Cole Beasley played in 10 games and made 15 receptions for 98 yards.

In 2013, he accumulated 39 receptions for 368 receiving yards and scored two touchdowns. He ended up having the highest completion percentage of any receiver in the NFL with more than 10 targets. Beasley became Tony Romo’s favorite target on third downs, which was contributed to Beasley’s precision route running skills.

In 2014, Beasley ended up finishing fourth on the team in both receptions (37) and receiving yards (420). He was also able to find the end zone four times.

On March 3, 2015, the Dallas Cowboys signed Cole Beasley to a four-year contract worth $13.6 million. He ended up having the best statistical season of his career, catching 52 passes for 537 receiving yards and scoring five touchdowns. His 52 receptions tied for second on the team and his five touchdowns led all Cowboys receivers that year.

Cole Beasley’s best statistical season — in 2015 — is largely attributed to Dez Bryant‘s ongoing battle with a foot injury, but is even more impressive considering he played with four different quarterbacks with varying degrees of knowledge of the offense.

Contract Status

Cole Beasley signed a four year, $13.6 million contract with the Dallas Cowboys on March 3, 2015.

Beasley received a $4 million signing bonus and $5 million in full guarantees. Cole Beasley’s 2016 salary becomes fully guaranteed if he is still on the roster on the fifth day of the 2016 season. He is also eligible for a $500,000 annual escalator. His contract makes him the 48th highest paid of 376 wide receivers in the NFL.

In 2016, Beasley’s base salary will be $2,356,000 and he will have a cap hit of $3,356,000. His base salary in 2017 will be $3 million and his hit against the cap will be $4 million. In the last year of his contract, 2018, Cole Beasley’s base salary will be $3,250,000 and his cap number will be $4,250,000.

The Cowboys will then have to decide if they want to sign him to a third contract or move on.

Level C2/C3 quadriplegic. College graduate with a bachelors degree in sports and health sciences-concentration sports management. Sports enthusiast. Dallas Cowboys fanatic. Lover of life with a glass half-full point of view.

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Player News

Report: Dallas Cowboys’ Ezekiel Elliott Planning Training Camp Holdout?

John Williams

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Ezekiel Elliott: NFL's History with Domestic Violence Shows Inconsistency, Hypocrisy 2

All offseason, the possibility of a new contract for Dallas Cowboys Running Back Ezekiel Elliott has been a hot button issue among media and fans alike. Not because Ezekiel Elliott isn't a great player and worthy of top running back money, but because the idea of paying running backs north of $15 million a year isn't as simple as, "Is he worth it?"

There is significant evidence that the running back position experiences a significant decline in production around their age 28 season and few running backs play into their 30's with good to elite production. Ezekiel Elliott, though he's experienced heavy usage in his first three seasons, could be the exception to the rule.

Well, knowing his worth to the Dallas Cowboys he's expecting a heavy payday at some point in the next couple of seasons. Elliott is under contract through 2019 and the Cowboys picked up his rookie option for 2020. So, technically, Elliott wouldn't be a free agent until the 2021 offseason. However, much like in the case of Todd Gurley, Elliott's looking to get paid early to maximize his prime years as the Dallas Cowboys running back.

Within the last hour, Mike Florio of Pro Football Talk released a report that Ezekiel Elliott is planning on holding out of training camp if he doesn't receive a new contract, per a "league source." It should be noted that Mike Florio has had some missteps in his reporting of Dallas Cowboys news, most notably the perpetuating a rumor that Dez Bryant was caught on videotape doing something at a Wal-Mart, that would have a "Ray Rice type of impact." A tape that has never been discovered or produced and a story that's completely died off since it was originally reported in 2015.

Given the recent news that Melvin Gordon is planning a training camp hold out, it should come as no surprise that Elliott is being mentioned similarly. ESPN even mentioned the idea of Elliott and a looming contractual holdout in a piece earlier today, but their prediction pointed to 2021 and wasn't a report based on fact or a source, but a prediction for next year.

The two-time NFL rushing champ is scheduled to make $7.9 million in 2019 and just over $9 million in 2020 as the fifth-year option to his rookie contract. Elliott certainly has earned the right to be paid like Todd Gurley ($14.37 million per year), Le'Veon Bell ($13.13 million per year), and David Johnson ($13 million per year) despite having two more years on his deal.

In looking at the long-term impact of Elliott's contract, I've advocated that if the Dallas Cowboys intend to pay Elliott, now's the time to do it. A contract extension now, that adds three or four more years onto his existing deal would get Elliott and the Dallas Cowboys to his age 28 or 29 season. In a well-structured contract, they'd have opportunities to get out at the back end if Elliott experienced a significant decline in production.

Ezekiel Elliott's contract is going to continue to be a hot button issue until he's either signed to an extension or it's made known that the Dallas Cowboys have no intention of extending him. Currently, there aren't any other sources confirming Elliott's plan to hold out of training camp, which starts July 27th, but it's a story that we'll continue to follow here on InsideTheStar.com.

Update: 7/15/2019 1:45 pm.

Charles Robinson, Senior Reporter for Yahoo! Sports provided some insight into the thinking of Elliott and his representation.

It certainly seems like holding out is on the table for Ezekiel Elliott and his representation, but no decision has been made at this point.

Check back with us for updates on Ezekiel Elliott's contract extension. 


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Dallas Cowboys

Dallas Cowboys 2019 Training Camp Preview: Safety

Jess Haynie

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Xavier Woods

The Dallas Cowboys' safeties may have the been the team's most-talked-about position during the 2019 offseason. Dallas declined making a splashy free agent signing, or even a high draft pick, and that means safety is still a hot topic headed into this year's training camp.

Fans hoping for an Earl Thomas signing or a Juan Thornhill drafting have had to settle for veteran George Iloka and 6th-round rookie Donovan Wilson. These new arrivals don't bring the sizzle that many wanted, but they do add intrigue to the battle for roster spots and depth chart positioning.

Here's the projected safety depth chart right now for the 2019 season:

  1. Xavier Woods, Jeff Heath
  2. George Iloka, Kavon Frazier
  3. Darian Thompson, Donovan Wilson
  4. Jameill Showers

A big reason the Cowboys didn't spend big at safety is Xavier Woods, who is a rising star on defense entering just his third season. Dallas' strategy appears centered around Woods' development, hoping he will anchor the position and make everyone look better.

Woods' fellow starter could be Iloka or the returning Jeff Heath. It is assumed that these two veterans will battle it out for the strong safety job, with the loser being a versatile and experienced backup.

Heath has the advantage of experience with the Cowboys but Iloka has more starting experience overall with 79 games to just 41 for Jeff. You also have to think that Defensive Backs Coach Kris Richard had a hand in selecting Iloka from the free agent pool, likely coveting his 6'4" size.

Even if Iloka does win the starting job Heath should remain a valued reserve and special teams leader. His $2.95 million cap hit for 2019 isn't that high for someone who fills those roles.

Regardless of starting jobs, we expect all three of those players to make the roster. It's below them where actual roster spots are on the line.

Cowboys Training Camp: 5 Fringe Players Fans Should Follow

Dallas Cowboys safety Kavon Frazier (Brad Rempel-USA TODAY Sports)

After three years at backup safety, Kavon Frazier is facing some real competition for his job in 2019. Not only is there the aforementioned rookie Donovan Wilson, but reserve Darian Thompson may already be moving ahead of Frazier on the depth chart.

Thompson was a 3rd-round pick of the Giants in 2016, the same year that Dallas drafted Frazier in the 6th round. He was named a starter in Week 2 as a rookie, but got hurt that game and missed the rest of they ear. He started all 16 games in 2017, but then was injured again and released prior to the start of the 2018 season.

After less than a week on the Cardinals' practice squad, Thompson got signed to the Cowboys' roster last October as a reserve. They re-signed him this offseason, and reports from mini-camps and OTAs had Darian getting second-team reps in practice over Kavon Frazier and other prospects.

If Thompson has ascended, the biggest concern for Frazier and Donovan Wilson is just how many safeties the Cowboys keep. They've kept five before but could easily go with just four, and that might leave two talented players out in the cold.

If Frazier and Wilson do wind up battling for that fifth and final spot, the rookie may have the edge thanks to youth and his four-year contract. Kavon is a free agent next year, so Dallas might elect to keep the younger, cheaper option for further development.

From starting jobs to just keeping The Star on their helmets, these safeties have a lot to fight for in 2019. It's been one of our most interesting positions to watch all offseason, and that won't change when we head into training camp.

~ ~ ~

OTHER 2019 CAMP PREVIEWS


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Star Blog

If Sean Lee’s the Cowboys Starting SAM LB, Who’s his Backup?

Brian Martin

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Do the Dallas Cowboys Have a Sean Lee Backup Plan?

If you believe the talk around the water cooler, Sean Lee is going to be the Dallas Cowboys starting strong side (SAM) linebacker in 2019.

On paper this looks like a brilliant move. It puts the Cowboys best three linebackers (Jaylon Smith, Leighton Vander Esch, and Sean Lee) on the field the same time when they are in their base defense. It should also help "General Lee" healthwise since the SAM LB over the last three years (Damien Wilson) never played more than 30% of the defensive snaps.

But, we all know No. 50 has struggled to remain healthy for an entire season pretty much his whole career. What happens if he once again succumbs to the injury bug? Who do the Dallas Cowboys plan on making his backup?

I think second-year LB Chris Covington, not to be confused with DT Christian Covington, could get the first crack at becoming Lee's backup. At 6'2", 245 pounds, he has the size to play SAM, but he's unproven and will have to prove himself in training camp and preseason to become a serious consideration.

There may be a dark course candidate to become Sean Lee's primary backup.

Luke Gifford

Dallas Cowboys LB Luke Gifford

Luke Gifford, an undrafted LB out of Nebraska, was supposedly pretty impressive in previous summer workouts. He's been spoken pretty highly of already, but like Covington needs to prove himself. Could he be another undrafted hidden gem?

Dallas Cowboys Staff Writer Bryan Broaddus seems to like what he's seen so far from Gifford.

"If there is a young linebacker to keep an eye on I have a sneaky feeling about Gifford. This kid has a nose for the ball. He plays well on the move and he's a finisher when he gets into position to make plays. Gifford can play both inside and out which gives him that flexibility coaches covet. Where Gifford is going to have to make his mark is in these padded practices and then in preseason games. I have already seen flashes of traits and instincts and range which makes me believe he could pull this off."

You can't help but like the way Broaddus talks about Luke Gifford. He sounds like the kind of depth player the Cowboys like due to his versatility and skill set, but he's going to have to continue to prove himself when the pads come on if he wants to stick around. That's the life of an undrafted free agent though.

It may seem a little odd to talk abbout backup players this early, but because of Sean Lee's inability to remain healthy it could be an important position battle to keep an eye on once training camp gets underway. I know I'm going to be keeping a close eye on Chris Covington (#59) and Luke Gifford (#57). What about you?

Who do you think will become Sean Lee's primary backup at SAM LB?


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