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Potential WR Prospects Dallas Cowboys Could Target in Each Round

If you were to look at the Dallas Cowboys depth chart at wide receiver right now you would think they were set at the position. But, the way they’ve approached the offseason and some of the prospects they’ve shown an interest in throughout the draft process seems to suggest otherwise. Wide receiver seems to be very much in play at some point in the draft, quite possibly as soon as 58th overall.

The only thing the Dallas Cowboys really know for sure right now is Amari Cooper and Michael Gallup are the only WRs they can count on. Every other WR on the roster is a question mark, and yes that includes Randall Cobb, who has struggled to remain healthy the last few seasons of his career. That’s why it wouldn’t be surprising if the Cowboys added another receiver at some point in the 2019 NFL Draft.

With all of that in mind, I thought I would share with you a few of the potential receiver prospects the Dallas Cowboys could target in each round of the draft. Let’s take a look…

Second Round

Deebo Samuel
South Carolina, WR, Deebo Samuel

Deebo Samuel, South Carolina

Deebo Samuel was a three-year starter at South Carolina and scored over 30 touchdowns in his collegiate career (16 receiving, 7 rushing, 4 kickoff returns, 2 passing, and 1 fumble return). He played both outside WR and out of the slot for the Gamecocks, and was put in motion often to create favorable mismatches. He’s not a burner, but his inside/outside versatility and ability to pick up yards after catch should get him on the field early and often as a rookie.

N’Keal Harry, Arizona State

N’Keal Harry was a three-year starter at Arizona State. He lined up primary on the left side of the formation as their “X” WR, but also played out of the slot as well. He is a physical receiver with a fearless attitude, soft natural hands, and a solid route runner. He only has average athleticism and will struggle to create separation on his own, but his physical play and ability to track the ball down the field should make him a solid No. 2 or “big slot” WR in the NFL

Third Round

Mecole Hardman
Georgia, WR, Mecole Hardman (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

Mecole Hardman, Georgia

Mecole Hardman was a one-year starter at Georgia. He started his career at cornerback as a true freshman before making the switch to slot WR his sophomore season. He is an elite athlete, dangerous return man, and potential two-way player. He is still raw as a slot WR with inconsistent route running, but his finishing skills are outstanding. He needs some seasoning, but has the ability to be a dangerous playmaker much like Tyreek Hill.

Terry McLaurin, Ohio State

Terry McLaurin was a three-year starter at Ohio State, carving out a role for himself as a deep threat, blocker, and special teams standout. He is an unselfish player with a team-first mentality. He scored 19 receiving touchdowns for the Buckeyes and uses his suddenness and route quickness to create separation from defenders. He is a dangerous threat after the catch due to his speed and projects best as a slot WR in the NFL. Although, he is capable of playing the “X” position as well.

Fourth Round

Emanuel Hall
Missouri, WR, Emanuel Hall

Emanuel Hall, Missouri

Emanuel Hall was a three-year starter at Missouri and was one the best deep threats in the nation the past two seasons. His ability to accelerate to top speed almost instantly allows him to stack cornerbacks vertically, leaving him on an island alone waiting for the ball. Unfortunately, he is inconsistent catching the ball and has struggled remaining healthy throughout his collegiate career. He has immense talent though and could go much earlier if a team is okay with his red flags.

Stanley Morgan Jr., Nebraska

Stanley Morgan Jr. was was a four-year starter at Nebraska and finished his career with the Cornhuskers as their all-time leading WR in catches (189) and receiving yards (2,747). He is a precise route runner with exceptional ball skills and an understanding of how to box out defenders at the catch point. His passion for the game shows up on film and he isn’t afraid to the dirty work as a blocker either. He played both inside and out in college, but projects best as a “big slot” in the NFL.

Fifth Round

Jakobi Meyers
NC State, WR, Jakobi Meyers

Jakobi Meyers, NC State

Jakobi Myers was a two-year starter at NC State, playing primarily out of the slot for the Wolfpack, which is where he projects best in the NFL as well. He is a solid route runner with a good understanding of how to work in open space and play with good leverage, but only has average athleticism and speed. He needs to clean up his route running to help create separation at the next level, but he has the skill set to have a long career as a slot receiver.

Hunter Renfrow, Clemson

Hunter Renfrow was a four-year starter at Clemson and took over the slot receiver duties as a freshman and never looked back in his four seasons with the Tigers. He also served as a backup QB and punter during his career. Renfrow is the most savvy and precise route runner in the entire 2019 WR draft class. He was so reliable at getting open Clemson implemented “third and Renfrow” into their playbook. He is a slot only WR, but someone who could step in with the Dallas Cowboys and replace Cole Beasley.

Seventh Round

Preston Williams
Colorado State, WR, Preston Williams

Preston Williams, Colorado State

Preston Williams may have been just a one-year starter at Colorado State, but he showcased the necessary skill set to develop into a true No. 1 receiver in the NFL. He has the size, length, and athleticism to become a top receiving option at the next level, but his checkered past and concerns about his maturity will end up making him a late round pick. His red flags will be a deal-breaker for a lot of teams, but he is one of those high risk/high reward prospects the Dallas Cowboys are willing to gamble on.

Jazz Ferguson, Northwestern State

Jazz Ferguson was a one-year starter at Northwestern State. He lined up exclusively on the left side as the “X” receiver in the Demons offense. He is a former four-star recruit out of high school and started his collegiate career at LSU before his grades slipped, causing him to transfer. He is an intriguing size/speed WR capable of winning at the catch point due to his basketball background, but he needs to fine-tune nearly every aspect of his game. He is a developmental prospect with starting upside.

What do you think?

Brian Martin

Written by Brian Martin

Level C2/C3 quadriplegic. College graduate with a bachelors degree in sports and health sciences-concentration sports management. Sports enthusiast. Dallas Cowboys fanatic. Lover of life with a glass half-full point of view.

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