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Should I Stay or Should I Go: Scott Linehan vs Rod Marinelli

Despite their 9-7 finish and barely missing out on the playoffs, the Dallas Cowboys were highly disappointing in 2017. After going 13-3 last year, expectations were very high for this season. The Cowboys didn’t come close to meeting them, and now many are naturally expecting heads to roll.

While the news right now is about position coaches, such as WR coach Derek Dooley not re-signing or TE coach Steve Loney retiring, most are focused on coordinators Scott Linehan and Rod Marinelli. With head coach Jason Garrett getting a clear vote of confidence from Jerry Jones, fans are clamoring for change at the next level down.

This article isn’t about whether or not Scott Linehan or Rod Marinelli will be fired.

Right now, the last we’ve heard is Jerry Jones recently commenting that he’d like both to be back next year. However, we also know that the season is still under review and the future of both coordinators is hardly written in stone. So, what we’ll look at today is whether Scott Linehan or Rod Marinelli should be back in 2018.

Did the performance of their offense and defense, respectively, make or break the case for them to keep their jobs?

Scott Linehan
Dallas Cowboys Offensive Coordinator Scott Linehan

Scott Linehan, Offensive Coordinator

The raw data on Linehan’s offense is pretty damning.

The total offense (yardage) dropped from 5th in 2016 to 14th in 2017. The same drop, from 5th to 14th, occurred with scoring. Dallas had one of the top offenses a year ago and was middle of the road this season. Of course, the six-game suspension of Ezekiel Elliott was a major factor in this decline.

Elliott still led the NFL in rushing yards on a per-game average. If he’d played all season, the total offense would have gone up a fair bit. It may not have been top-five, but close enough that we might not call what happened a regression.

But this is where stats can be deceiving. Even when Elliott was playing, the Cowboys offense did not have its same function or flow from 2016.

Dak Prescott‘s historic efficiency from his rookie season cratered. He threw 13 interceptions compared to just four in 2016, his completion percentage dropped from 67.8% to 62.9%, and his passer rating went from an elite 104.9 to a pedestrian 86.6.

This was never more evident than in the Cowboys’ Week 16 debacle against the Seattle Seahawks. Even with Elliott back and rushing for over 100 yards, Prescott looked lost, throwing two picks and barely functioning against a Seattle defense that has struggled all year.

Richard Sherman and Kam Chancellor didn’t need to be out there; Dak wasn’t getting it done against anybody that day.

Dak Prescott
Dallas Cowboys QB Dak Prescott

Part of Dak’s issues this year has been the missed time by left tackle Tyron Smith. Most notorious was the Week 10 game in Atlanta, where Prescott was sacked eight times, but Dak has been under duress for much of the season. Which is thanks to health issues from Tyron and also right tackle La’el Collins, as well as the decreasing ability of his receiving options to beat their coverage and get open.

That’s a lot of factors, but in the end it goes up to the man in charge. Scott Linehan has proven, both in 2015 and this year, that he is not good at overcoming adversity as a coordinator.

He can run a great offense when all the pieces are in place and running smoothly, but even minor issues can unravel his guys. He doesn’t adjust well, which was never more evident than the Atlanta game, when there was no answer for the Falcons pass rush.

Prescott’s regression in 2017 is a major blemish on Linehan’s resume.

Sophomore slumps happen, but Dak went from one of the most efficient quarterbacks in the game to a major liability. Some of that is assuredly on Prescott, but he’s not Tony Romo out there calling audibles left and right.

Prescott relies far more on the coordinator than Tony did, as most second-year players would, and Linehan let him down with a predictable offensive strategy that even average defenses were able to contain.

Having Ezekiel Elliott all year — and none of the distractions that came from his ongoing legal fight — would’ve helped. There’s no denying that. But the Cowboys needed more than a front-runner at offensive coordinator this year.

They needed someone with the ingenuity to devise new strategies based on missing personnel. They needed a guy who could see that his young QB was struggling and find ways to settle him down.

Instead they got what Scott Linehan had to offer; plays that even fans on their sofa could predict.

They got the 2016 playbook with seemingly no adjustment for 2017 realities. And they got one of the ugliest losses in Cowboys history when Dallas could barely run a play against a broken Seahawks defense.

The Cowboys can do better than Scott Linehan. I only hope they try.

Rod Marinelli
Dallas Cowboys Defensive Coordinator Rod Marinelli

Rod Marinelli, Defensive Coordinator

Again, let’s start with the stats. The Cowboys improved from 14th in total defense (5,503 yards) in 2016 to 8th (5,089 yards) in 2017. They allowed 19.1 points-per-game in 2016 and that number was about the same this year at 20.8 points.

Surprisingly, total sacks were about the same. Despite DeMarcus Lawrence breaking out with 14.5 sacks this year, the team total only improved from 36 last year to 38 in 2017. This may help explain why opponent passer ratings stayed almost exactly the same, averaging about a 94 rating both seasons.

Unlike the offense which returned most of its personnel, Marinelli’s defense had a lot of changes.

They said goodbye to four major defensive backs in Morris Claiborne, Brandon Carr, Barry Church, and J.J. Wilcox, and replaced them with rookies. They tried to integrate redshirt rookie Jaylon Smith at linebacker with mixed results.

Along with that, stud defensive lineman David Irving missed half the season with an early suspension and then a concussion later on. Maliek Collins, one of last year’s stalwarts, battled a foot injury all season and was clearly not the same. Worst of all, Sean Lee missed five games and the defense was clearly lost without him.

Taco Charlton, Rams
Dallas Cowboys DE Taco Charlton

However, unlike the Cowboys offense, the defense got better as the season went along.

Those rookie cornerbacks and first-round DE Taco Charlton were playing well in December. Jaylon Smith showed improvement almost every week. Backup safeties Xavier Woods and Kavon Frazier were making strong cases for bigger roles.

You could say Maliek Collins regressed some, but how much of that was due to injury is hard to say. The defense’s biggest disappointment was safety Byron Jones, who did not show the kind of growth in his third year that you’d have wanted.

Overall, though, Rod Marinelli’s boys overcame turnover and adversity and mostly showed individual development throughout the year.

Despite the failings of the Cowboys offense from last season, Marinelli’s defense was able to improve on some of last year’s stats and at least maintain performance in other areas.

It may seem underwhelming, statistically, but the way the defense responded to carrying a heavier burden this year deserves praise. Last year’s efficient offense that dominated the clock and kept the defense out of tough spots was gone. But we saw numerous occasions where the defense responded to bad field position or ongoing punts and did their job.

The defense kept the Cowboys in games that the offense didn’t deserve to win.

Again, we go back to Week 16 against the Seahawks. Dallas forced Russell Wilson into one of the worse games of his Pro Bowl career, and it was solely the offense and special teams that let the Cowboys down. The defense did its part this year to get the Cowboys into the playoffs.

I don’t know how much more Rod Marinelli could’ve done with the hand he was dealt. He had to integrate a lot of new and inexperienced players, plus adjust to meltdowns on the other side of the ball, and still came out with a stronger-looking group than he had in 2016. If that doesn’t do it for you, your expectations aren’t realistic.

Conclusion

Scott Linehan showed an inability to adjust to changing circumstances and a lack of growth among his personnel. The offense, even with Ezekiel Elliott, was worse than a year ago. Rod Marinelli showed the opposite; players improved and obstacles were overcome as the defense grew from last year despite significant turnover.

While some new players would also help, a new voice is needed on offense.

Even if Linehan can do the job when everyone’s healthy, Dallas needs to find a guy who can still get it done when it’s not easy. They need a coordinator who can identify and adjust to changing circumstances, both in a single game and over the course of a year.

Even if all of that isn’t enough, Dallas needs to find a guy who doesn’t try to get too cute. When it’s 1st-and-Goal from the 3-yard-line, they need a guy who won’t outsmart himself by not giving the ball to Ezekiel Elliott.

That one series alone — you all know which one I’m talking about — was unforgivable.

On the other side of the ball, there is ample reason to keep Rod Marinelli.

His players are responding and improving. His scheme may be frustrating at times because of the soft coverage, but it works. It keeps points off the board. And as these young corners get better and more aggressive, it will lead to a lot more turnovers than you’ve seen.

Linehan should go. Marinelli should stay. We’ll see if the Cowboys agree.

What do you think?

Jess Haynie

Written by Jess Haynie

Cowboys fan since 1992, blogger since 2011. Bringing you the objectivity of an outside perspective with the passion of a die-hard fan. I love to talk to my readers, so please comment on any article and I'll be sure to respond!

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