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Dallas Cowboys Player Profile: RB #21 Ezekiel Elliott


Ezekiel Elliott, #21

#21 Ezekiel Elliott

Height: 6-0 Weight: 225 Age: 20
Position: Running Back College: Ohio State
Exp: Rookie

Ezekiel “Zeke” Elliott was born on July 22, 1995 in Alton, Illinois. Ezekiel Elliott is an NFL running back for the Dallas Cowboys and was drafted in the first round of the 2016 NFL Draft. He played collegiately at Ohio State University where he earned All-American honors in 2015.

Dallas Cowboys Player Profile: RB #21 Ezekiel Elliott

High School

Ezekiel Elliott attended high school at John Burroughs School in Ladue, Missouri. Even though John Burroughs School was known more for their academics, Elliott was a standout player in several sports, including football, baseball, track, and basketball.

Ezekiel Elliott was a standout track and field athlete and was a state qualifier in different sprinting and hurtling events. He won four state championships at the Missouri Class 3 state championships and was amazingly able to accomplish this in just 2 ½ hours. He recorded his career best times in the 100-meter dash (10.95 seconds), the 200-meter dash (22.05 seconds), 110-meter high hurdles (13.77 seconds), and the 300-meter hurdles (37.52 seconds). He was named the Gatorade Track Athlete of the Year in the state of Missouri because of his accomplishments.

Elliott played running back for the John Burroughs Bombers football team, and as a junior in 2012 was named the St. Louis Post-Dispatch Offensive Player of the Year after rushing for 1,802 yards and scoring 34 touchdowns. He also caught 23 passes for 401 receiving yards and scored six touchdowns.

In his senior year, Ezekiel Elliott accumulated 3,061 all-purpose yards and 50 total touchdowns, including 2,155 rushing yards and 40 rushing touchdowns. In his high school career he led the Bombers to three straight title games, but they lost all three. He also played in the U.S. Army All-American game and became the unofficial poster boy for the event.

Ezekiel Elliott was considered a four-star recruit by Rivals.com coming out of high school and was listed as the #9 running back in the nation in 2013. 247Sports.com had Elliott rated as the fourth best running back.

Despite the fact that both of his parents were student athletes and attended the University of Missouri, Ezekiel Elliott decided to become an Ohio State Buckeye.

College/NCAA

As a true freshman in 2013, Ezekiel Elliott saw action 11 games playing behind future second round draft pick and Big Ten Running Back of the Year, Carlos Hyde. He carried the ball 30 times for 262 rushing yards. He also averaged 8.7 yards per carry and scored two touchdowns.

Elliott became the starter as a sophomore in 2014 and ran for 1,878 yards on 273 rushing attempts. Elliott’s 1,878 rushing yards was second-most in school history, second only to Eddie George’s 1,927 rushing yards back in 1995. Ezekiel Elliott also had 28 receptions for 228 receiving yards. He won the James E Sullivan Award, Archie Griffin Award, and was named to the Academic All-Big Ten Conference team. Ezekiel Elliott became only the third Buckeye to top 2,000 all-purpose yards in a season.

As a junior in 2015, Elliott rushed for 1,821 yards and scored 23 touchdowns on just 289 rushing attempts. He also added 27 receptions for 206 receiving yards. He ended up finishing eighth in the Heisman Trophy voting, but won plenty of other awards.

  • Big Ten Offensive Player
  • Running Back of the Year
  • First Team All-Big Ten
  • Won Chicago Tribune’s Silver Football Award as the Big Ten Most Valuable Player (only the 18th Buckeye to ever win it)
  • AP and FWAA second-team All-American
  • Maxwell Award semifinalist

Ezekiel Elliott finished his career at Ohio State second in career rushing yards, behind Archie Griffin (5,589) and ahead of Eddie George (3,768), with 3,961 rushing yards. He will be remembered as one of the best running backs in Ohio State history.

2016 NFL Draft

Ezekiel Elliott didn’t have to wait long to hear his name announced in the 2016 NFL Draft.

The Dallas Cowboys held the 4th overall draft pick and didn’t hesitate to write his name down on the draft card.

The running back position has been devalued somewhat over the past several years, but Elliott’s production in college and the fact that there really aren’t any holes in his game makes him a surefire day one starter for the Dallas Cowboys.

The Cowboys could have decided to go defense in the first round, but the the pairing of Ezekiel Elliott with the Cowboys’ young and dominant offensive line was too much of a temptation to pass up.

Ezekiel Elliott was the highest drafted running back since Trent Richardson, when he was drafted third overall by the Cleveland Browns in the 2012 NFL Draft.

NFL Career

Ezekiel Elliott’s professional career has yet to kick off, but there are a lot of high hopes from fans and people within the Cowboys organization who believe that big things are ahead of him in the NFL.

Elliott is already the “unofficial” favorite to win Rookie of the Year and a lot of that can be attributed to not only his talents as a running back, but the fact that he will be running behind the Cowboys’ dominant offensive line.

Predictions aside, Ezekiel Elliott is one of the best all-around running backs to enter the NFL since Adrian Peterson, and there are a lot of high expectations being placed on his arrival in Dallas.

Contract Status

Ezekiel Elliott signed a four-year contract with the Dallas Cowboys worth $24,956,338 and will make an average of $6,239,085 per season, which makes him the ninth highest paid running back out of 200 running backs in the NFL. Elliott also received a $16.35 million signing bonus.

Elliott’s base salary as a rookie in 2016 will be $450,000 and his cap number will be $4,537,516. In 2017, his base salary will be $1,584,379 and his cap number will be $5,671,895. His 2018 base salary will be $2,718,758 and his cap number will be $2,806,274. In his final year of his rookie contract his base salary will be $3,853,137 and his cap number will be $7,940,653.

The Dallas Cowboys will then have to decide whether they want to pick up his fifth year option or offer him a long-term contract.

Level C2/C3 quadriplegic. College graduate with a bachelors degree in sports and health sciences-concentration sports management. Sports enthusiast. Dallas Cowboys fanatic. Lover of life with a glass half-full point of view.

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Dallas Cowboys

2019 Dallas Cowboys the Best Roster of the Jason Garrett Era

John Williams

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Potential Playoff Preview: Kirk Cousins, Vikings Come to Town for Wild Card Round 1

It's still very early in the evaluative process for the Dallas Cowboys' coaches and scouts, but all things point to this being the best roster during Jason Garrett's tenure as head coach. The 2014 and 2016 teams had the best finishes of the Garrett era, but on paper, this 2019 roster looks like a team that can contend for a Super Bowl with few glaring weaknesses on offense or defense.

It may be a stretch to suggest that this team is better than the 2014 Cowboys that went 12-4 or 2016 team that went 13-3. Both of those teams were a couple of plays away from heading to the NFC Championship. However, those team had holes and weren't nearly as deep as this 2019 squad appears to be. Neither team fielded a defense as good as the players the Cowboys will put on the field in week one.

In 2014, the offense was one of the best in the NFL, scoring the fifth most points at 29.18 points per game. They were seventh in total yards. Tony Romo had the best season of his career while DeMarco Murray led the NFL in rushing. Dez Bryant was prime Dez Bryant catching 16 touchdowns and averaging 15 yards per reception. And Jason Witten was still a great player for the Cowboys averaging more than 10 yards per reception. In his most recent seasons of 2016 and 2017, Witten's seen that number dip below 10 yards per reception.

2014 was the first season we saw the combination of Tyron Smith, Travis Frederick, and Zack Martin on the field together and it provided a glimpse of what an elite offensive line could look like. Doug Free at right tackle and Ronald Leary at left guard were no slouches either. Though they didn't get as much positive publicity as the rest of their offensive linemates, they were effective in their own right and were a big part of the reason why DeMarco Murray and Tony Romo were able to have the seasons they had.

At wide receiver, the Cowboys are better than they were in 2014 or 2016. In 2014, it was Dez Bryant, Terrance Williams, Cole Beasley, Dwayne Harris, and Devin Street. In 2016, the wide receiver group consisted of Bryant, Williams, Beasley, Lucky Whitehead, and Brice Butler. Heading into 2019, the Cowboys look to have one of the deeper wide receiver groups in the NFL featuring Amari Cooper, Michael Gallup, Randall Cobb, Tavon Austin, Allen Hurns, and Noah Brown. Three of the six wide receivers projected to make the roster have at least one 1,000 yard receiving season under their belt. Tavon Austin is as dynamic a player as you'll find if he can stay healthy and Michael Gallup and Noah Brown are young, but ascending players in the NFL.

In 2016, the NFL was taken over by the Dallas Cowboys rookies phenoms. Dak Prescott and Ezekiel Elliott were the leaders on an offense that was led by Cole Beasley at wide receiver. Back in 2016, the Dak Prescott and Ezekiel Elliott led Dallas Cowboys finished fifth in the NFL in points and yardage. Though Dez Bryant was one of the best wide receivers in the NFL in 2014, he was a shell of himself in 2016. Bryant dealt with injuries during the season and was missing during the Cowboys biggest regular season win at the Green Bay Packers. Neither group had the depth that the 2019 team takes to Oxnard.

As good as that offense was, the 2019 group is going to be better. Dak Prescott and Ezekiel Elliott are going into their fourth year in the NFL and are better players now than when they were rookies. Not only are they better, but they have better skill position players than the 2016 team did, which should help take pressure off of Ezekiel Elliott and the running game and make it easier for Dak Prescott to find success.

With a fresh perspective from Kellen Moore and some fine tuning of Prescott's footwork, this offense should be just as good as the 2014 and 2016 offenses.

The offenses in 2014 and 2016 stole the show for the Dallas Cowboys. The defenses, on the other hand, got by without much in the way of talent.

In Rod Marinelli's first season as the defensive coordinator, the Cowboys largely got by with their bend don't break defense. They were a defense that was good enough and was largely carried by their offense throughout the season. 2016 wasn't much different.

The 2014 or 2016 Dallas Cowboys didn't have elite pass rushers like DeMarcus Lawrence and Robert Quinn bookending the defensive line. If you recall, Jeremy Mincey led the team with six sacks that season before DeMarcus Lawrence came on strong in the playoffs against Detroit and Green Bay. Henry Melton was second on the team with five sacks. In 2016, Benson Mayowa led the Dallas Cowboys with six sacks and second on the team was Maliek Collins with five sacks. For perspective, in 2018, Lawrence had 10.5 sacks and Randy Gregory had six sacks.

The 2019 Dallas Cowboys boast six players who've had at least five sacks in a season in Lawrence, Quinn, Gregory, Kerry Hyder, Tyrone Crawford, and Maliek Collins. The Cowboys go two-deep along the defensive line with legit pressure players at every position.

Rolando McClain and Anthony Hitchens were the leaders at the linebacker position for the Cowboys. McClain was excellent in the 13 games he played for Dallas. In 2016, Sean Lee had an outstanding season, which culminated in a First Team All-Pro selection and Anthony Hitchens was good. However, as a unit, neither 2014 or 2016 had as much talent as the 2019 Dallas Cowboys do at linebacker with Jaylon Smith, Leighton Vander Esch, Sean Lee, and Joe Thomas. There isn't a better 4-3 linebacker group in the NFL than what the Dallas Cowboys are rolling out there in 2019.

At defensive back, the Cowboys were rolling out Barry Church, J.J. Wilcox, Brandon Carr, Orlando Scandrick, and Sterling Moore as their starting nickel group. I'd easily take Byron Jones, Chidobe Awuzie, Anthony Brown, Xavier Woods, and Jeff Heath. Throw in Jourdan Lewis and the Cowboys probably have the best four-deep cornerback group in the NFL. Even if you aren't a big fan of Jeff Heath at strong safety, he's still a better option than J.J. Wilcox was in that 2014 season. George Iloka and Donovan Wilson provide significantly better depth than the 2014 or 2016 groups at defensive back.

Think about the roster as a whole. They have a perceived weakness at starting strong safety with Jeff Heath, but they were able to make the playoffs with Jeff Heath and the defense was one of the best in the NFL in 2018. The defense in 2019 should finish in the top five in scoring and yards against. They're going to be a disruptive group that constantly puts pressure on the quarterback and if they're able to create turnovers, they'll be the best unit in the NFL.

As much as we fight against it, this Dallas Cowboys roster heading into 2019, is the best they've had since 2011. The defense is definitely better going into 2019 than they were in 2014 or 2016 and the offense has a chance to be just as good as those two successful seasons.

On paper, they're a team ready to contend for a Super Bowl. After not making an NFC Championship game since 1996, the time has come for the Dallas Cowboys to turn all the hype into results. No matter how hard I try to manage expectations for the 2019 season, I can't help but think that this iteration of the Dallas Cowboys is on the verge of greatness.


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Jaylon Smith’s “Clear Eye View” Coming Into Focus

Matthew Lenix

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Jaylon Smith's "Clear Eye View" Coming Into Focus

Jaylon Smith's career nearly ended before he even stepped foot on an NFL field.

The 2016 Fiesta Bowl featured two top-shelf college programs, Notre Dame and Ohio State. You would think the headlines of such a contest would be of excellence on the gridiron but in the first quarter that would all change. Smith would suffer a gruesome knee injury, tearing both his ACL and MCL. The timing couldn't have been worse considering the NFL Draft was just three months away, and the Irish star was looked at as a potential top 10 pick. Many thought his stock would plummet tremendously, but the Dallas Cowboys had a different view in mind so to speak.

On January 7th Smith would have successful surgery to repair both ligaments in his knee. Just four days later, he announced he would forego his senior year and enter the NFL Draft, and the long road to recovery began.

Surprisingly, just six weeks post surgery, Smith was already squatting 500 pounds, truly an amazing accomplishment considering his physical status. By late April, he was already doing field work as he worked his body back into peak condition. When you take into account the seriousness of his injury just three months prior, it was mind-blowing to see him dropping into coverage and swatting a tackling dummy just before the NFL Draft.

Noticeably, he was wearing an Ankle-Foot Orthosis (AFO) device. The nerve damage in his knee caused a condition called drop foot. The brace provided stabilization to the ankle, foot, and knee for Smith and his workout videos began to generate buzz across the NFL landscape.

After taking All-Pro Running Back Ezekiel Elliott with the 4th overall pick, the Cowboys took what many deemed an unnecessary gamble with the 34th pick in round two. Even with the doubts flowing rapidly, they decided Smith was worth the risk and made him a Dallas Cowboy. Now that his pro football home had been determined it was time to get to work.

It would be a long shot for Smith to see the field as a rookie, and he wouldn't risk further damage rushing back too quickly. Instead, he spent the season rehabbing and getting acclimated to the Cowboys defensive philosophy, at least as much as he could without actually being on the field of battle. He could be seen on the sidelines cheering his football brothers on weekly as they went 13-3 and won the NFC East, but as we all know, players want to play, and there's no doubt that Smith was itching to make his presence known.

After a year and a half of rehab, and high expectations just from his workout videos alone, Jaylon Smith made his long-awaited NFL debut week one of 2017 against the Giants. It was clear he wasn't quite back to the player that was so highly praised coming out of college, but you could see the flashes. He finished with 81 tackles, 2 forced fumbles, 2 passes defended and 1 sack. More than solid for your first year on the field after ACL and MCL tears.

For years, the Cowboys defense was looked at as the teams weakest unit, but in 2018 that all changed, in large part because of the play of Smith. He would catapult his name into the conversation of the elite linebackers in all of football with his performance in year two. 121 tackles, 2 forced fumbles, 2 fumble recoveries, 4 passes defended and 4 sacks. This would silence any and all doubters who questioned rather he would ever reach his ceiling, and it also got him named PFF's (Pro Football Focus) Breakout Player of the Year. Also, following the lead of their new defensive star, the Cowboys finished 5th against the run, 7th in fewest points allowed, 7th in total defense and a solid 13th against the pass. I guess it's safe to say if you follow the lead of Jaylon Smith good things will come.

The biggest takeaway from last season in regards to Jaylon Smith was just how unlimited he looked movement wise. No hesitation, no timid motions at all when you watch his film. He shot through gaps like a Cheetah hunting an Antelope, to use a National Geographic analogy. We are seeing exactly why the Cowboys turned in his draft card in 2016, and they are reaping the benefits tremendously.

Now, as the 2019 season approaches look for an All-Pro level season from Smith. He's improved every year he's been on the field and there's no sign of that stopping in the near future. Plus, he has two things most middle linebackers don't have, an All-Pro on each side of him with teammates Leighton Vander Esch and Sean Lee, making life that much easier for him. Limitations and doubts have been cast aside and now look for Jaylon Smith to raise his game to another level. The "Clear Eye View" is in full swing.


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Prescott, Elliott, and Cooper Resembling Nineties Triplets

Matthew Lenix

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Prescott, Elliott and Cooper Resem

They say history repeats itself, and we could be looking at a rerun in Dallas.

The Cowboys of the nineties were lead by three future Hall of Famers Troy Aikman, Emmitt Smith, and Michael Irvin on offense. An accurate passer, elite level runner and a clutch receiver. Now the modern-day version is lead by three top-shelf players in their own right. Dak Prescott has won more games than any quarterback since 2016 not named Tom Brady. Ezekiel Elliott has two rushing crowns in his first three years. And Amari Cooper is a multiple time pro bowler and one of the best receivers in the game. The similarities, however, don't end there.

First, let's look at the quarterbacks, Aikman and Prescott.

In 1989, the Cowboys were looking to solidify the quarterback position and snatching up the former Oklahoma Sooner and UCLA Bruin was a no brainer. Aikman went number one in the NFL Draft because of his prototypical size and accurate arm. However, his career didn't get off to a Canton, Ohio type start. He threw just nine touchdowns while simultaneously doubling that number in interceptions. The team would lose all eleven of Aikman's starts and finished with the leagues worst record at 1-15.

When 1991 rolled around things started to change when Aikman lead the Cowboys to a 6-4 record but unfortunately got hurt against the eventual Super Bowl Champion Washington Redskins. Backup Quarterback Steve Beuerlein would lead the Cowboys to a 5-0 record to finish the season and a road playoff win in Chicago. The next week in Detroit the Cowboys were down 17-6 at halftime and Aikman was brought in to maybe provide a spark but it was unsuccessful. After the 38-6 beatdown and uncertainty, if he had the trust of coach Jimmy Johnson, Aikman thought about demanding a trade. But soon after he would get his vote of confidence and the keys to the franchise.

In 1992 Aikman was entering year four and took full advantage of this new belief in him. He had career highs in completions (302), yards (3,445), and touchdowns (23). The Cowboys finished a 13-3 and were the number two seed in the NFC Playoffs. The former first-round pick would have his finest hour in Super Bowl XXVII. Going 22-30 for 273 yards and four touchdowns. A performance that landed him a well deserved Super Bowl MVP.

Dak Prescott, however, wasn't as celebrated as Aikman coming out of college in 2016. He would be drafted in the fourth round as the potential heir the Tony Romo's throne. The third string rookie got a few breaks heading into his inaugural season. When Kellen Moore and Tony Romo both suffered injuries, Prescott was thrust into the starting lineup. After losing his first start against the Giants, he would run off 11 straight wins on his way to leading the Cowboys to a 13-3 record and the top seed in the NFC.

He would struggle in 2017, especially with Ezekiel Elliott missing six games. The Cowboys went 9-7 and missed the playoffs. Some wondered if Prescott was really as good as his rookie season indicated or did he have to have the ideal situation in order to perform. But in 2018 however, not only did Prescott improve, but he would get his first playoff win against the Seahawks. Now, similar to Aikman nearly three decades earlier, Prescott is entering year four in 2019 and currently in negotiations for a major contract extension. Will his fourth campaign end in Super Bowl glory as well?

Next, we look at the running backs, Smith and Elliott.

In 1990 Emmitt Smith and his now infamous polka-dot vest came to Dallas to solidify the running game. He would have a solid rookie season with 937 yards and the Cowboys improved their win total by six games. In 1991 Smith ran for 1,563 yards and won his first of four rushing titles, and the Cowboys went 11-5 and made the playoffs.

When his third season rolled around in 1992 the former Florida Gator would firmly establish himself as the NFL's top ball carrier. Winning his second consecutive rushing crown with a then-franchise record 1,713 yards. He would cap off the season with 108 yards in Super Bowl XXVII as the Cowboys won the franchises third title.

Ezekiel Elliott was a lock as a top 5 pick heading into the 2016 NFL Draft. Names like Joey Bosa and Jalen Ramsey would be linked heavily to the Cowboys. However, they decided to go in another direction, and with the fourth pick, they got their bell cow in the backfield taking Elliott out of Ohio State. He wasted no time setting his mark on the NFL by leading the league in rushing with 1,631 yards in only 15 games.

2017 would have plenty of headaches for Elliott as he dealt with the possibility of a six-game suspension for domestic violence allegations. After a long battle with the league, he would ultimately accept his punishment but still managed to rack up 983 yards in ten games. With no off the field distractions weighing him down, he bounced back with another All-Pro season in 2018 and added his second rushing title to his resume with 1,434 yards. Now, Elliott enters year four in 2019, just a year further along than Emmitt in 1992. Is there another rushing title and a Super Bowl victory on the horizon?

Lastly, let's look at the wide receivers, Irvin and Cooper.

Michael Irvin was a part of Tom Landry's final draft class in 1988. In 1989, the future Hall of Famer torn his ACL which would cause him to miss the remainder of the season and the first four games of 1990. After extensive rehab, he would finally put it all together in 1991. He had his second-best season in both receptions (93) and yards (1,523) and started a string of five consecutive Pro Bowl selections and his only first-team All-Pro honor.

Irvin would follow that brilliant season with another in 1992. With 78 receptions for 1,396 yards, he had firmly established himself as one of the leagues best at his position in his fifth season. But on the biggest stage, he would have his most legendary performance. He scored consecutive touchdowns in the second quarter that essentially blew the game wide open, and the Cowboys won 52-17 in Super Bowl XXVII.

Amari Cooper came into the NFL with big expectations coming out of Alabama in 2015, and he wasted no time living up to them. In his first two seasons, he would rack up over 1,000 yards in each and be selected to the Pro Bowl. After a slightly down year in 2017, Cooper's days in Oakland were numbered when the team brought in Jon Gruden to be the head coach in 2018. He cleaned house with Raiders which included trading Cooper to the Cowboys for a first round pick, and life changed dramatically in Dallas.

His immediate chemistry with Dak Prescott couldn't be denied as the offense would open up immensely now that it had a true number one receiver. Cooper would reach 1,000 yards for the third time and receive a third Pro Bowl selection, as the Cowboys would make the playoffs after a year absence. Now like Irvin in 1992, year five is approaching for Amari Cooper. Can his impact be enough to help the Cowboys win the Super Bowl in 2019? Time will tell.

Prescott, Elliott, and Cooper are at the same points in their careers as Aikman, Smith, and Irvin were in 1992 when they started their run of three Super Bowls in four years and their paths to Canton. Is this the start of another Cowboys dynasty? Are we witnessing the new Triplets? Now, of course, the jury is still out if this present day version can carry that title, but I'm not saying that they can't, or that they won't.


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